Discovering our Ancestors' Travels and Travails

Archive for the ‘DNA’ Category

Kaniecki Family in Buffalo, New York

When I first started documenting family history in the 1990s, I mistakenly thought that my great-grandmother Anna Kalinowska Szczepańska‘s family name was Kaniecki. My Aunt Imelda said that her mother Marya was close to her cousin Joanna Kaniecka, who had married Jan Beresniewicz. Even after Marya‘s death in 1951, my father and his siblings would pick up “Aunt Jennie” to take her with us to visit the Szczepański family in Bennington, New York.

My aunts Cele and Imelda told me that Joanna/Jennie‘s father Jan Kaniecki was an “uncle” on their mother Marya‘s side of the family. Because of their certainty, I included the Kaniecki family in Buffalo on pages 156-157 of the Descendants of Martin and Anna Szczepański book, although we were not sure how we were related.

Jan and Rozalia Kaniecki and their three children Anna (14), Johanna (7), and Władysław (2) were listed immediately after Martin, Anna, Frank (7), and Mary (5) Szczepański in Buffalo in the 1892 New York State census.

1892 New York State Census, Buffalo, Erie, New York

1900

In 1900, John, Rozalia, Władysław, and Johanna Kaniecki lived at 259 Detroit Street in Buffalo. Their daughter Anna had married Walenty Domalski 8 Oct 1895 at St. Stanislaus Church in Buffalo, New York, and lived at 289 Detroit Street. The census record indicates that the couple had immigrated in 1882 and that three of Rozalia‘s eight children were living in 1900. In the St. Stanislaus church registers I found two Kaniecki children who were born and died in Buffalo, Józef (28 Nov 1882-4 Dec 1882) and Rozalia (11 Jul 1887-9 Oct 1890).

1900 federal census, John and Rosalie Kaniecki, Buffalo, Erie, New York

On 20 July 1909, the Buffalo Courier, under Marriage Licenses on page 6, column 6, listed “John Beresniwicz, 30, No. 404 Sweet Avenue—Jennie Kaniecka, 25, No. 34 Woltz Avenue.”

1910

The Kaniecki and Beresniewicz families were together at 242 Clark Street in Buffalo, Erie, New York, in the 1910 federal census, including three month old Władysław Beresniewicz, who was listed as Vladislaus.

1910 federal census, Kaniecki and Beresniewicz families, Buffalo, Erie, New York

Władysław/Walter Kaniecki had enlisted in the military in 1908 and in 1910 he was a private in the U.S. Coast Artillery at Fort Howard in Baltimore, Maryland.

The Beresniewicz family lived at 66 Gates Street in Sloan, Erie, New York, in 1918 when Jan Beresniewicz, a veteran of the Spanish American War, registered for the World War I draft.

1920

Rozalia died between 1910 and 1920, because widowed John Kaniecki was listed in the 1920 census with his daughter Anna and granddaughters Sophia and Clara on 376 Gibson Street in Buffalo, New York.

1920 federal census, Anna, Sophia, Clara Domalska and John Kaniecki, 376 Gibson Street, Buffalo, Erie, New York

Walter Kaniecki served in the United States Army in World War I. He had married Louise Mentzer in Maryland and in 1920 they were at 107 Sturtevant Street, Greenfield, Highland Park, Wayne, Michigan, United States, with their daughter Regina.

1920 federal census, Walter, Louise, and Regina Kaniecki, Greenfield, Wayne, Michigan

In 1922, Walter and Louise‘s son Walter Kaniecki was born across the Detroit River in Windsor, Ontario. A dual citizen, he joined the Canadian Army in 1941 and was killed in action in Italy in 1944. His widow and son, also named Walter Kaniecki, lived in North Bay, Ontario, Canada.

Jan Kaniecki died in 1928. His death notice was published in Dziennik dla Wszystkich,“Everybody’s Daily,” the Buffalo, New York, Polish daily newspaper from 1911 to 1957.


Dziennik dla Wszystkich, 1955-Jan-24

On Wednesday, August 15th 1928, at 1:50 PM he departed this earth after having received the Sacraments.

In holy remembrance of

John Kaniecki

The late John Kaniecki was born in Poznań. He came to America 45 years ago.

Funeral services will be on Saturday, August 18th, at 8:30 AM at the house of mourning on 138 Rolland Street, Sloan, N, Y., to St. Andrew Church at 9 AM and afterwards to St Stanislaus Bishop & Martyr Cemetery.

For this sad ritual family and friends are invited in mourning.

FAMILY

John J. Buszka, mortuary.

1930

In 1930, John and Jennie Beresniewicz lived at 138 Rolland Street, Sloan, New York, with their children Walter, Frank, and Irene.

1930 federal census, John and Jennie Beresniewicz, 138 Rolland Street, Sloan, Erie, New York

Louise Mentzer Kaniecki died in Canada in 1934, and in 1936 widower Walter Kaniecki married a Canadian woman, Corena Marquette Parent. As Corinne Kaniecki, she became an American citizen in 1943.

1950

Władysław/Walter Kaniecki died 20 August 1953.


1953, “US Headstone Application for Military Veteran,” Walter Kaniecki.

His widow’s “United States Headstone Application for Military Veterans” indicated that Walter Kaniecki had been a Captain and his final resting place was Windsor Grove Cemetery in Windsor, Ontario, Canada.


DOMALSKI—Anna Kaniecki, Buffalo Evening News, 25 January 1955

Anna Kaniecki Domalski‘s death notice in the Buffalo Evening News, read

DOMALSKI—Anna Kaniecki Domalski, Jan. 23, 1955, of 31 Hempstead Ave., wife of the late William Domalski; mother of Mrs. Mary James, Mrs. Sylvia Richards and Mrs. Charles Coons; sister of Mrs. Jennie Beresniewicz and the late Capt. Walter Kaniecki; grandmother of Frank Anders, Mrs. Frank Heigl, Marie and Charles Coons; also survived bv 3 great-grandchildren. Funeral service from Carlton A. Ullrich Funeral Home. 3373 Bailey Ave., Wednesday at 8:15 and from St. James Church at 9 o’clock. Friends are invited.


DOMALSKI—Anna Kaniecki, Buffalo Evening News, 25 January 1955

Joanna/Jennie Kaniecka Beresniewicz died 2 Feb 1976 and was buried 5 Feb 1976 at St. Adalbert Cemetery in Lancaster, Erie, New York.

Here is a summary of Jan and Rozalia‘s known children and grandchildren.

1-Jan KANIECKI (1850-1928)
+Rozalia KRAUSE (1846- abt 1914)
. . . 2-Anna KANIECKA (1877-1955)
. . . +Walenty DOMALSKI (1873-1924)
. . . . . . 3-Bernard DOMALSKI (1896-1897)
. . . . . . 3-Marya DOMALSKA (1898-1967)
. . . . . . 3-Zofia DOMALSKA (1902-1974)
. . . . . . 3-Clara DOMALSKA (1905-1982)
. . . 2-Józef KANIECKI (1882-1882)
. . . 2-Joanna KANIECKA (1884-1976)
. . . +Jan BEREŚNIEWICZ (1876-1951)
. . . . . . 3-Władysław BEREŚNIEWICZ (1909-1988)
. . . . . . 3-Franciszek BEREŚNIEWICZ (1912-1985)
. . . . . . 3-Irena Teresa BEREŚNIEWICZ (1919-2004)
. . . 2-Rozalia KANIECKA (1887-1890)
. . . 2-Władysław KANIECKI (1890-1953)
. . . +Louise Hannah MENTZER (1890-1934)
. . . . . . 3-Regina KANIECKI (1915-1982)
. . . . . . 3-Walter KANIECKI (1922-1944)
. . . +Corena Marquette PARENT (1908-1986)

In 2018, our Szczepański/Kalinowski genetic connection to the Kaniecki family was confirmed when the son of Władysław (Walter) Beresniewicz tested his DNA with Ancestry.com. We share a 10.4 centimorgan DNA segment. Two of our four shared matches had Kalinowska ancestors going back to Szembruk, West Prussia. Anna‘s birth name was Kalinowska and she and Marcin Szczepański also came from Szembruk, West Prussia, so that is likely our link in the old country.

Sources

  • 1900 Federal Census, New York, population schedule, Buffalo Ward 9, Erie, New York, John Kaniecki; digital images, HeritageQuest (heritagequestonline.com : accessed November 2017).
  • 1900 Federal Census, New York, population schedule, Buffalo Ward 9, Erie, New York, , Anna Domalski.
  • 1900 Federal Census, New York, population schedule, Election District 3 Buffalo city Ward 14, Erie, New York, United States, , Josef Beresniewiez.
  • 1910 Federal Census, New York State, population schedule, Buffalo Ward 8, Erie, New York, John Kaniecki; digital images, Heritage Quest Online (www.heritagequestonline.com : accessed November 2017).
  • 1910 Federal Census, Maryland, population schedule, Election District 15, Baltimore, Maryland, Walter Kaniecki; digital images, HeritageQuest (heritagequestonline.com : accessed 9 February 2019).
  • 1915 New York State Census, New York State, population schedule, Cheektowaga, A.D. 07, E.D. 03, Erie, New York, United States, , John Beresniewicz; FHL microfilm .
  • 1920 Federal Census, New York, population schedule, Buffalo Ward 10, Erie, New York, Anna Domalska; digital images, HeritageQuest (heritagequestonline.com : accessed December 2017).
  • 1920 Federal Census, New York, population schedule, Buffalo Ward 10, Erie, New York, , Anna Domalska.
  • 1920 Federal Census, Michigan, population schedule, Greenfield, Wayne, Michigan, Walter Kaniecki; digital images, HeritageQuest (heritagequestonline.com : accessed February 2019).
  • 1925 New York State Census, New York, population schedule, Buffalo Ward 10, Erie, , Anna Domalski; FHL microfilm .
  • 1930 Federal Census, New York, population schedule, Buffalo, Erie, New York, USA, Sophia Damalski; digital images, HeritageQuest (heritagequestonline.com : accessed January 2018).
  • 1930 Federal Census, New York, population schedule, Cheektowaga, Erie, New York, USA, John Beresniwicz.
  • 1940 Federal Census, New York, population schedule, Sloan, Cheektowaga Town, Erie, New York, United States, John Beresniewicz.
  • 1940 Federal Census, New York, population schedule, Cheektowaga, Erie, New York, , Jenny Banniewicz.
  • 1940 Federal Census, New York, population schedule, Cheektowaga, Erie, New York, Sophie Anderzyak; digital images, HeritageQuest (heritagequestonline.com : accessed February 2018).
  • 1940 Federal Census, Michigan, population schedule, Detroit, Wayne, Michigan, Walter Kenecki; digital images, HeritageQuest (heritagequestonline.com : accessed November 2017).
  • New York State, Department of Health, Vital Records Index, Certificate Number: 50230, John Kaniecki, 15 August 1928, Albany, New York.
  • Jan Kaniecki, Dziennik dla Wszystkich [Everybody’s Daily], Buffalo, New York, 1928-Aug-16.
  • Buffalo, New York, death no. Volume 200, Certificate Number: 160 (Death Date: 1909-1914), Rose Kanicka; City Clerk’s Office, City Hall, Reclaim the Records, archive.org.
  • St. Stanislaus Bishop & Martyr RC Church,  Buffalo, New York, Church records, FHL microfilm, Family History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah.
  • St. Stanislaus Bishop & Martyr RC Church (Buffalo, New York), , Deaths, page 110, Jozef Kaniecki; FHL microfilm .
  • St. Stanislaus RC Church, Buffalo, New York, Deaths, page 152.
  • Ancestry, Jan Kanicki.
  • Dziennik dla Wszystkich, 1955-Jan-24.
  • DOMALSKI—Anna Kaniecki, Buffalo Evening News, Buffalo, New York, 25 January 1955, Vital Statistics 21.
  • New York State Vital Records Index, 1955, Certificate Number: 1833, Anna K Domalski.
  • “Find a Grave,” database, Find a Grave (findagrave.com: accessed February 2018), Anna Domalski.
  • “United States Public Records Index,” database, “United States Public Records, “United States Public Records” (ancestry.com: accessed January 2018), Valentine Domalski; citing Original Data: Voter Registration Lists, Public Record Filings, Historical Residential Records, and Other Household Database Listings.
  • Social Security Administration, “U.S. Social Security Death Index,” database, Death Master File (: accessed 17 February 2019), Jennie Beresniewicz, 053-52-9477.
  • St. Stanislaus RC Church, Buffalo, New York, Births, page 64.
  • St. Adalbert RC Cemetery (Lancaster, New York), gravestones and record cards, Jennie Beresniewicz.
  • Beresniewicz-Kaniecka, Buffalo Courier, Buffalo, New York, 20 July 1909, page 6, column 6.
  • New York State Vital Records Index, Marriage, Certificate Number: 11292, Jennie Kaniecka, John Beresniwicz.
  • “World War I Draft Registration Cards,” database, Ancestry.com (: accessed 14 February 2019), John Joseph Beresniwicz.
  • “Registers of Enlistments in the United States Army, 1798-1914,” https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:QJDR-HVJ9, United States, FHL microfilm 1,465,935., National Archives and Records Administration, Washington, DC.
  • New York State Vital Records Index: cause 420, Cert No. 23327, John Beresniewicz.
  • Find a Grave, John Beresniewicz.
  • “US Headstone Applications for Military Veterans,” digital images, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 13 February 2019), Walter Kaniecki.
  • “Kaniecki, Walter.” Pension applications for service in the US Army between 1861 and 1900.
  • National Archives, “World War II Draft Registration Cards,” database, Ancestry.com ( ancestry.com : accessed November 2017), Walter Kaniecki.
  • Ontario, Canada Vital and Church Records, “Drouin Collection 1621-1968,” Ancestry (ancestry.com : accessed 14 February 2019), Walter Leo Kaniecki.
  • “Ontario, Canada, Deaths and Deaths Overseas,” database, Ancestry.com (: accessed 13 February 2019), Walter Mentzer Kaniecki; Archives of Ontario; Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
  • “Canada, WWII Service Files of War Dead, 1939-1947,” database, Ancestry.com (: accessed 13 February 2019), Walter Mentzer Kaniecki; Library and Archives Canada, Ottawa, Canada.
  • “Find a Grave,” database, Find a Grave (findagrave.com: accessed 13 February 2019), Trpr Walter Mentzer Kaniecki. Veterans Affairs Canada, “Canadian Virtual War Memorial,” database, Government of Canada, Canadian Virtual War Memorial (canada.ca : accessed 13 February 2019), Trooper Walter Mentzer Kaniecki, Service Number: B/62278, Montecchio War Cemetery , Italy, Grave I. F. 10; citing Commonwealth War Graves Commission.
  • Michigan Marriage Records, Ancestry, (ancestry.com : accessed November 2017), Mr Walter W Keniecki-Corrinne Parant.
  • “Ancestry,” database, Ancestry (ancestry.com: accessed 13 February 2019), Corrine Margeret Kaniecki; citing Passenger Lists.
  • “U.S. Naturalization Records Indexes,” database, National Archives and Records Administration (NARA); Washington, D.C.,  (ancestry.com : accessed 13 February 2019), Corena Marquette Parent Kaniecki.
  • Social Security Administration, “U.S. Social Security Death Index”, database, Death Master File, Corinne M Mann.
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Researching Świętokrzyskie Ancestors

Our maternal grandmother, Agnieszka Kapuscinska Skrok Kiec, was the only grandparent my younger sisters and I ever knew. Our grandfathers Jan Skrok and Antoni Maciejewski had both died in 1936, when our parents were only five and eight years old. Our father’s mother Marya Szczepańska Maciejewska died in 1951, four years before I was born.

Gnieszowice-Wikipedia
Gnieszowice, Koprzywnica, Sandomierz, Świętokrzyskie, Poland

I was curious about my grandmother’s origins, and the land of my ancestors. In 2004, I joined a group tour of Poland, then rented a car to visit Gnieszowice, the small village near Koprzywnica, Sandomierz, where documents indicated my maternal grandmother had been born in 1895. Although I was able to verify my grandmother’s birth in the former synagogue that had become the Archives in Sandomierz, I did not think I would be able to do much research in the Polish records.

That changed in March 2015, when I attended the Polish Genealogical Society of Massachusetts presentation by Julie Roberts Szczepankiewicz at the Chicopee Public Library on Locating Vital Records in Poland Using Online Resources, or, I Found My Village! Now What? She answered questions I did not know I had, and her detailed examples clearly illustrated her points. I was inspired.

Following her example, I used the Geneteka database of the Polish Genealogical Society (in Poland!) to find the birth records of my mother’s parents, their siblings, and their parents’ marriage records, indexed with their parents’ names. I learned how I was related to people I knew were cousins, but I was not sure how. Our ancestors came to Buffalo in the early part of the twentieth century from an area near Sandomierz, in the Russian occupied area of Poland, in what is now the Świętokrzyskie (Holy Cross) province. To the family names I knew from western New York–Kapuściński, Kasprzyk, Kiec, Kwiatek, Rzepka, Skrok, Szczepański, and Witoń–I was able to add my great-great grandparents and the names Kołek, Bartkiewicz, Zybała, and Kaczmarz to my family tree. Needless to say, I was pleased to make a donation to contribute to the volunteer site.

When I learned that Julie Roberts Szczepankiewicz was to give a presentation on Polish Genealogy Research to the Polish Genealogical Society of New York State at their April 2016 meeting in Buffalo, I encouraged PGSNYS members to attend. I also reached out to several of my DNA matches in western New York and nearby Canada.

Although one of my DNA matches from southern Ontario was unable to attend the presentation, we exchanged information. She had been adopted, but she knew the names of her birth parents. coin that Grandma Drach sewed to her hemHer birth father had even given her a tangible piece of her heritage, one of the coins that had been sewn into the interior hem of her ancestor’s dress when she left the country telling her that it was ‘not allowed’ to take monies out and that they ‘escaped’. 

My DNA match had found the ship manifests from her father’s parents’ arrivals in Canada, but she was not sure from where they had come. But I did! I had been down this road and I knew some of the signposts. And we’re family!

loniow
Suchowola, Osiek, and Świniary, Łoniów, near Gnieszowice, Koprzywnica; Google map

Her grandfather Józef Drach‘s ship record said he was born in Świniary, Sandomierz. There are 2 very small villages named Stare Świniary and Nowe Świniary approximately 3 kilometers south of Łoniów. In Polish, Stare means old, Nowe means new. Both villages are in the administrative district of Gmina Łoniów, within Sandomierz County, Świętokrzyskie, about seven kilometers from Gnieszowice, where my grandmother Agnieszka was born.

Drach
Józef Drach, ship Lituania from Danzig to Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, 1930

Józef‘s parents were identified as Jan and Katarzyna Drach. Jan is the Polish version of the English name John. Katarzyna is the Polish name for Katherine.

Geneteka had an indexed record that indicated that Jan Drach and Katarzyna Borycka married in  Łoniów in 1895 (entry #23), as well as listing the baptism of Józef Drach in Łoniów in 1905 (entry #27). The church in Łoniów is Kościół św. Mikołaja, St. Nicholas. While the record indices have been posted online, I did not find the original records.

My DNA match’s grandmother was Aniela Wieczorek. Her ship record said she was born in Suchowola, and her sister Katarzyna lived in Suchowola, Sandomierz. Today, Suchowola is a village in the administrative district of Gmina Osiek, within Staszów County, Świętokrzyskie Voivodeship. It is not far from Sandomierz.

The nearest church is Kościół św. Stanisława Biskupa i Męczennika, St. Stanislaus Bishop and Martyr, in Osiek. Since ship and Canadian records said that Aniela Wieczorek was born in 1900 or 1901, the most likely record is in 1900, entry 143.

1900 Aniela Wieczorek birth
Aniela Wieczorek birth record, 1900, Osiek, Urząd Stanu Cywilnego, Św. Stanisława

Aniela‘s nearest relative was listed as her sister Katarzyna Janoś (sp?).

aniela
Aniela Wieczorek, ship Melita from Warsaw, Poland, to Saint John, New Brunswick, Canada, 1924

 Katarzyna Wieczorek was a popular name, with baptisms of girls with that name occurring regularly in Osiek.

  • 1891  35
  • 1893  134
  • 1895  71
  • 1896  78
  • 1897  100
  • 1901  83

Although these records were available online, they were written in the Napoleonic format in Cyrillic, because this area was occupied by Russia in the 19th and early 20th century. I was not able to read the records myself, but my DNA match was able to use this information to extend her family tree to Michał Wieczorek and Franciszka Czech and beyond.

GEDmatch estimated the number of generations to our most recent common ancestor (MRCA) is 4.8, since we share a 19.1 centiMorgan DNA segment on chromosome 3. While we have not found our common ancestors, we found the common location where our ancestors lived.

loniow2
Zamek Krzyżtopór, Baranów Sandomierski, and Sandomierz, Świętokrzyskie, Poland, Google map

When traveling in Poland, I stayed at the hotel at Baranów Sandomierski Castle, across the Wisła (Vistula) River from our grandparents’ birth places. I also visited the towns of Sandomierz and Opatów, and Krzyżtopór Castle in Ujazd,  Iwaniska, Opatów, about 22 kilometers from Łoniów. I had read about these places in James Michener’s novel, Poland, and I was glad to make the connection to our family history in what is now Świętokrzyskie province.

Sources

Wikipedia contributors, “Gnieszowice,” Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Gnieszowice&oldid=771022160 (accessed December 18, 2018).

“Ancestry,” database, Ancestry (ancestry.com: accessed 12 December 2018), Jozef Drach; citing Passenger Lists. Jozef Drach, Male, 25, abt 1905, Poland, Departure Port: Danzig, Poland, Arrival date: 8 Apr 1930, Arrival Port: Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, Vessel: Lituania; Library and Archives Canada; Ottawa, Ontario, Canada; Series: RG 76-C; Roll: T-14825; Ancestry.com. Canadian Passenger Lists, 1865-1935 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2010. Library and Archives Canada, n.d. RG 76-C. Department of Employment and Immigration fonds. Library and Archives Canada Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.

Polskie Towarzystwo Genealogiczne, “Geneteka, Metryki,” database, Polish Genealogical Society, Genealodzy (genealodzy.pl: accessed 2016), Józef Drach; citing church records or Urząd Stanu Cywilnego (Civil Registry Office). 1905 27 Józef Drach Łoniów Łoniów [Indeks dodał: Wojciech_Liśkiewicz] .

Genealogiczne, Genealodzy, Jan Drach, Katarzyna Borycka. 1895 23 Jan Drach Katarzyna Borycka Łoniów [ Miejscowość: Łoniów] [Indeks dodał: Wojciech_Liśkiewicz] .

“Ancestry,” database, Ancestry, Aniela Wieczorek, Female, abt 1900, Birth Place: Suchowola, Age: 24, Date of Arrival: 12 Apr 1924, Port of Arrival: Saint John, New Brunswick, Port of Departure: Warsaw, Poland, Ship Name: Melita, Library and Archives Canada; Form 30A Ocean Arrivals (Individual Manifests), 1919-1924; Rolls: T-14939 – T-15248; Ancestry.com. Canada, Ocean Arrivals (Form 30A), 1919-1924 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2009. Library and Archives Canada. Form 30A, 1919-1924 (Ocean Arrivals). Ottawa, Ontario, Canada: Library and Archives Canada, n.d.. RG 76. Department of Employment and Immigration .

Towarzystwa Genealogicznego Centralnej Polski, Birth, Aniela Wieczorek; digital images, Towarzystwa Genealogicznego Centralnej Polski (http://metryki.genealodzy.pl : accessed December 2018). 1900 143 Aniela Wieczorek Osiek Osiek [Indeks dodał: Jabłoński_Edward]

Towarzystwa Genealogicznego Centralnej Polski, Marriage, Jan Czosnek, Franciszka Cech; digital images, Towarzystwa Genealogicznego Centralnej Polski (http://metryki.genealodzy.pl : accessed December 2018). 1880 3 Jan Czosnek Franciszka Cech Osiek [ Miejscowość: Osiek] [Indeks dodał: Jabłoński_Edward]

Towarzystwa Genealogicznego Centralnej Polski, Marriage, 1890 4, Michał Wieczorek Franciszka Czosnek; digital images, Towarzystwa Genealogicznego Centralnej Polski (http://metryki.genealodzy.pl : accessed December 2018). 1890 4 Michał Wieczorek, Franciszka Czosnek Osiek [ Miejscowość: Osiek] [Indeks dodał: Jabłoński_Edward]

Michener, James A. Poland. Random House, 1983

“Cabbage” Patch Kids: Kapusta/Kapuściński DNA Cousins

I find genetic connections fascinating. They are clues, like anything else, and need research and documentation. I recently reached out to a DNA match on Ancestry.com. Although we were only distantly related, with 9.6 centimorgans shared across 1 DNA segment, we both had the Kapuscinski name in our family trees and ties to Buffalo, New York. I wanted to learn if we shared common ancestors, or could identify a place where our common ancestors had been.

His ancestors were also identified as Kapusta. Although I knew that Kapusta and Kapuściński had the same root word, this was the first family I had seen using both versions of the name.

name Kapus

Entry from William F. “Fred” Hoffman’s Polish Surnames: Origins and Meanings, 2001

It was not surprising that there could be different versions of the same Polish name. The Polish language changes words to indicate gender, number, and case. For example,

  • the -ski ending indicates an adjective, for possession or affiliation
  • -ska is the feminine form of the adjective
  • -owski/-owska indicates the place of
  • -owa is the ending used for a wife’s name
  • -ówna is an unmarried daughter, etc.

So the same root name can have various endings, depending how it is used by a Polish speaker. For more about Polish names, see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polish_name.

Agnes Kapuscinska chart

Ancestors of Agnieszka Kapuścińska

My grandmother Agnieszka Kapuścińska was born in February 1895 in Gnieszowice, Koprzywnica, near Sandomierz in Russian Poland. Now it is in the Świętokrzyskie province of Poland. Her sister Maryanna had come to the United States in 1912, and paid for her sister’s ticket the following year. Maryanna married Grzegosz Mastykarz in 1915, and Agnieszka married Jan Skrok in 1917. While I had previously identified my grandmother’s ancestors, and had been able to trace the sisters, I did not know of any other relatives named Kapuściński in Buffalo, New York.

However, I found Casimir and Mary Kapuszcinski in Buffalo, New York, in the 1930 United States Federal Census, at 73 Gibson Street.

1930 Kapuszcinski census cropped

1930 census record, Casimir and Mary Kapuszcinski, Buffalo, New York

In 1940, Casimir and Mary Kapusta were at 37 Lombard Street, in Buffalo, New York.

1940 Kapusta census cropped

1940 census record, Casimer and Mary Kapusta, Buffalo, New York

The older children had been born in Ohio, which made me look for information there. I found the 15 Oct 1928 marriage record for Kazimir Kapusta and Mary Staron, born Obora. Both had been previously married, and had been divorced, in Cleveland, Ohio.

1928 marriage Kapusta cropped

1928 Marriage Record, Kazimir Kapusta and Mary Staron, Warrensville, Ohio

In the 1920 census record, Casimer Kapusta was a lodger in the home of Walenty and Mary Starol [sic] at 3472 East 76th Street in Cleveland, Ohio.

1920 Kapuscinski census cropped

1920 census, Walenty and Mary Starol and Casimer Kapusta, Cleveland, Ohio

Walenty Staron married Victoria Falkowska in Shaker Heights, Ohio, on 23 Oct 1928. His naturalization record in 1944 identified his children and previous residence in Sandomierz, Poland.

1944 Staron naturalization children

1944 Naturalization Petition, Walenty Staron, Cleveland, Ohio

Born in Cleveland, Ohio, Maryanna Obora‘s children with Walenty Staron were

  • Szczepan (1915-1982)
  • Marta  (1917-2005)
  • Kazimiera  (1919-2018)
  • Czesław  (1921-1945)

The children of Kazimierz Kapusta and Maryanna Obora born in Buffalo, New York, were

  • Edward Jerome  (1927-2007)
  • Alfred  (1929-1932)
  • Richard J.  (1931-    )
  • Genevieve/Jean  (1933-2017)

Genevieve/Jean‘s grandson was my DNA match, so I wanted to see if we could find where in Poland his great-grandparents had been born, and if there were any links to my identified ancestors. We exchanged information on his other grandparents, but I was most interested in his Kapusta and Obora lines from Russian Poland.

1918 Kapusta WWI draft cropped

WWI Draft Registration Form, Kazimierz Kapusta, Cleveland, Ohio

Kazimierz‘ 1918 draft registration identified him as a “frendley alien” born in 1894 in “Bialobozie, Kelecska, Russia.” (Already, spelling is suspect.) Because I knew where my Kapuściński ancestors were from in the former Kielce province, it helped me to find Białoborze.

Wikipedia says “Białoborze is a village in the administrative district of Gmina Stopnica, within Busko County, Świętokrzyskie Voivodeship, in south-central Poland. It lies approximately 3 kilometres (2 mi) north-east of Stopnica, 18 km (11 mi) east of Busko-Zdrój, and 55 km (34 mi) south-east of the regional capital Kielce.”

A search on the Geneteka database for Kazimierz Kapusta in the Świętokrzyskie province showed that Kazimierz Kapusta  was born in 1894 in Białoborze to Jan Kapusta and Katarzyna Sikora, which matched the information on his marriage record. He was baptized (entry #66, according to the Geneteka index) at Kościół św. Apostołów Piotra i Pawła in Stopnica, not far from the area near Sandomierz where my Kapuściński ancestors were found. The Polish records were indexed, but I did not find the records themselves online.

From Geneteka, I could see Jan Kapusta and Katarzyna Sikora had these children in Białoborze. Unfortunately, the first boy, named Jan, died in 1891.

1891       41         Jan Kapusta
1892       53         Apolonia Kapusta
1894       66         Kazimierz Kapusta
1896       121       Jan Kapusta

Further research on Geneteka showed that

  • Jan Kapusta and Katarzyna Sikora were married in Stopnica (Skrobaczów) 1889.08.14.
  • Jan Kapusta was the son of Walenty Kapusta and Apolonia Lech.
  • Katarzyna Sikora was the daughter of Wojciech Sikora and Agnieszka Pawłowska.

Jan Kapusta, son of Walenty Kapusta and Apolonia Lech, died in 1897 (Stopnica entry 63) in Białoborze. On 1899.08.24, Katarzyna Kapusta (born Sikora) married Andrzej Jaros (Jarosz), the son of Ignacy Jaros and Antonina Włoch.

 

1913 Obora cropped

1913 Manifest for the ship Campania from Liverpool, England, to New York, New York

Maryanna Obora immigrated on 17 Feb 1913 to New York, New York, United States, on the ship Campania from Liverpool, England, with a final destination of Cleveland, Ohio. Her place of birth was listed as Dzieslawice in Russian Poland.

Wikipedia says “Dziesławice is a village in the administrative district of Gmina Stopnica, within Busko County, Świętokrzyskie Voivodeship, in south-central Poland.” Often immigrants who were married in the new country had previously known each other or each other’s families in the old country, as was the case here. Again, Geneteka was useful.

Marianna Obora was born in 1896 in Dziesławice to Wojciech Obora and Marianna Pyrz. Again, this was very close to the information on her marriage record. She was baptized (entry #256, according to the Geneteka index) at Kościół św. Apostołów Piotra i Pawła in Stopnica. As before, the Polish records were indexed, but I did not find the records themselves online.

From Geneteka, I could see Wojciech Obora and Marianna Pyrz had these children in Dziesławice. Sadly, the records say that Stanisław [sic] died in 1900 and Antoni in 1905.

1896       256         Marianna
1899       121         Stanisława
1904       11           Antoni
1906       102         Stanisława
1908       60           Józefa

Further research on Geneteka showed that

  • Wojciech Obora and Marianna Pyrz were married in Stopnica (Falęcin – Dziesławice) 1895.05.15.
  • Wojciech Obora was the son of Jan Obora and Marianna Wróbel.
  • Marianna Pyrz was the daughter of Kacper Pyrz and Franciszka Kania.

jean.jpg

Ancestors of Genevieve/Jean Kapuscinski

Our DNA connection is very small, and we do not have any common matches, so I was not surprised my DNA match and I did not find common ancestors in a few generations. But our forebears came from the same region, and I was able to put my prior experience with Geneteka to good use in identifying the ancestors of one of the grandmothers of my DNA match. Even genetically distant cousins can collaborate and share information to help one another find out more about their ancestors!

Sources

Hoffman, William F. Polish Surnames: Origins and Meanings. Chicago, Illinois : Polish Genealogical Society of America. 1993, Second Edition, Revised 2001.

“Polish name.” Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, 9 Aug. 2018. Web. 16 Aug. 2018.

1930 Federal Census, New York, population schedule, Buffalo, Erie, New York, USA, Casimir Kapuszcinski; digital images, HeritageQuest (heritagequestonline.com : accessed 13 August 2018).

1940 Federal Census, New York, population schedule, Buffalo, Erie, New York, Casimir Kapusta; digital images, HeritageQuest (heritagequestonline.com : accessed 13 August 2018).

Ancestry.com. Cuyahoga County, Ohio, Marriage Records and Indexes, 1810-1973 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010.

1920 Federal Census, Ohio, population schedule, Cleveland Ward 14, Cuyahoga, Ohio, Casimer Kapusta; digital images, HeritageQuest (heritagequestonline.com : accessed 13 August 2018).

Ohio, State Marriage Registers, Marriage, Walenty Staron, Victoria Falkowska, 23 October 1928.

Ancestry.com. Ohio, Naturalization Petition and Record Books, 1888-1946 [database on-line]. Lehi, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011.

“World War I Draft Registration Cards,” database, Ancestry.com (: accessed 13 August 2018), Kazimirz Kapusta; citing Ohio; Registration County: Cuyahoga; Roll: 1831773.

“Passenger Lists,” database, The Statue of Liberty – Ellis Island Foundation, Ellis Island (www.libertyellisfoundation.org: accessed 13 August 2018), Kazimierz Kapusta; citing ship manifests.

Polskie Towarzystwo Genealogiczne, “Geneteka, Metryki,” database, Polish Genealogical Society, Genealodzy (genealodzy.pl: accessed 13 August 2018); citing church records or Urząd Stanu Cywilnego (Civil Registry Office).

Finding my Maciejewski Family’s Ancestral Origins

I was recently contacted by someone researching Maciejewski ancestors who had the same first names as mine did. Although we did not appear to be related (Maciejewski is not a rare Polish name), I was able to commiserate about how difficult it can be to find places in the old country where our families originated, and demonstrate how, over years, I found and confirmed my Maciejewski family who came from West Prussia in 1883.

My great grandfather Jan Maciejewski‘s church death record said he was born in Tylice, and there are four places with that name in Poland. I picked one, and I guessed wrong. I wrote about it, though…  https://myfamilyhistoryresearch.wordpress.com/2015/02/22/maciejewski-from-tylice/

I researched Jan and Weronika Maciejewski‘s children’s baptism records in the United States… https://myfamilyhistoryresearch.wordpress.com/2015/04/10/st-stanislaus-baptism-records/

And saw that the parents were from Nieżywięć and Tylice in West Prussia… https://myfamilyhistoryresearch.wordpress.com/2015/04/11/maciejewski-family-from-tylice-near-niezywiec/

I finally found Jan and Weronika‘s marriage record… https://myfamilyhistoryresearch.wordpress.com/2015/04/21/marriage-of-johann-maciejewski-and-veronica-lewandowska-in-niezywiec-prussia/

But their son, my grandfather Antoni Maciejewski, was not born/baptized in Nieżywięć! I searched civil records from the Torun archives and found my grandfather’s birth record in 1883 in Zgniłobłotyhttps://myfamilyhistoryresearch.wordpress.com/2018/02/13/1883-birth-of-antoni-maciejewski-in-zgnilobloty-west-prussia/

Which helped me recognize the family’s arrival record at Castle Garden in New York City later that year… https://myfamilyhistoryresearch.wordpress.com/2018/02/20/maciejewski-family-arrived-in-new-york-21-december-1883/

And identify other children of this family who were born and died in West Prussia… https://myfamilyhistoryresearch.wordpress.com/2018/07/01/maciejewski-family-resilience

I recommend checking all the records, including siblings, cousins, and other relatives and friends. This is sometimes called “cluster genealogy.” When you seem to be stuck, genealogy author Elizabeth Shown Mills recommends checking the “FAN club”  of your ancestor’s friends, associates, and neighbors. Even for ancestors who were married in America, I have found that couples often knew of each other’s families in the old country.

I wrote about how my grandparents grew up and were married in the US, but their parents’ places of origin were only twenty miles apart half a world away… https://myfamilyhistoryresearch.wordpress.com/2017/12/25/torun-gingerbread/

That’s how chain migration works… https://myfamilyhistoryresearch.wordpress.com/2018/01/24/chain-migration/

Because of the interrelationships of our ancestors, I helped some DNA cousins find their grandparents’ places of origin… https://myfamilyhistoryresearch.wordpress.com/2018/05/06/kalinowska-from-szembruk-west-prussia-looking-for-common-ancestors/  and https://myfamilyhistoryresearch.wordpress.com/2018/05/11/szennato-szynnato-szynwald-gros-schonwalde-deciphering-polish-prussian-place-names/

I often share information about other families I find along the way. Others have helped me. It is always rewarding to help others find primary or contemporaneous sources, and I like to hear from researchers of related families.

Happy ancestor hunting!

Looking For a Common Maciejewski Ancestor

In A Tale of Two Families, I wrote about some AncestryDNA matches and the records I found while trying to discover our common ancestor(s). Briefly,

  • A baby boy was born to a young woman in Buffalo, New York, in 1906. One hundred eleven years later his great-grandson tested with AncestryDNA and matched several Maciejewski family members. I was surprised to find the connection, and researched it.
  • The first section looks at Tadeusz/Theodore Jurek‘s grandparents and great-grandparents back in Prussia. We do not appear to have a genetic connection there, so our relatively close DNA connection appears to be with Tadeusz‘ parents. Who were they?
  • The second section shows the Maciejewski and Jurek fathers died in 1890 and 1896.
  • In 1900 and 1905, the widows raised their kids, who were about the same ages, and the families moved to the same street. They knew one another. Proximity was important for baby-making.
  • In the 1910 census, Tadeusz Jurek appeared. Who was his mother? Not Władysława (Lottie), for sure. She had had four kids in seven years. Was it Marianna or Stanisława?
  • Multiple events show Marianna Jurek was Tadeusz‘ mother.
  • Interrelationships show that this Tadeusz/Theodore Jurek is the same person seen in Buffalo and Rochester, and links to the family in Long Island.
  • In early 2018, Tadeusz/Theodore Jurek‘s grandson F. also did a DNA test. AncestryDNA estimates that he is my second cousin.

Since we know I am not closely related to Marianna Jurek, F. would only be a half cousin, on Tadeusz‘ father’s side. Given our genetic connection, the two mostly likely candidates for the father of Marianna‘s son are Antoni Maciejewski or his brother Konstanty/Gust, since Ludwik was only eleven in 1905.

Maciejewski Jurek

Maciejewski and Jurek children in Buffalo, New York

  • If Antoni were the father, then
    • Tadeusz/Theodore and my father would be half-brothers,
    • F.‘s mother and I would be half first cousins, and
    • F. would be my half first-cousin one generation removed (half 1C1R).
  • If Konstanty/Gust were the father, then
    • Tadeusz/Theodore and my father would be first cousins,
    • F.‘s mother and I would be second cousins, and
    • F. would be my second cousin one generation removed (2C1R).

AncestryDNA says that F. and I share “208 centimorgans across 8 DNA segments” and estimates we are second cousins. Statistically,

  • second cousins share about 233 centimorgans (range 46-515)
  • half 1C1R share about 226 centimorgans (range 57-530)
  • 2C1R share about 123 centimorgans (range 0-316)

From analysis so far, it appears more likely that Antoni Maciejewski was Tadeusz/Theodore Jurek‘s father, but it could also have been his brother Konstanty/Gust.

Sources

https://myfamilyhistoryresearch.wordpress.com/2018/05/25/a-tale-of-two-families/

Bettinger, Blaine, Shared cM Project, International Society of Genetic Genealogy, https://isogg.org/wiki/File:Shared_cM_version_3.jpg, accessed 3 Jun 2018

A Tale of Two Families

Some of the more popular reasons people test DNA are to learn more about their heritage and perhaps, find some new relatives. After my own DNA test in late 2015, I was able to connect with the previously unknown daughter of a second cousin, and confirmed dozens of other known relatives.

In the fall of 2017, a new match appeared on AncestryDNA, estimated to be my fourth cousin, with 75 centimorgans shared across 3 DNA segments. We had multiple shared matches–3 great-grandchildren, 3 great-great-grandchildren, and 1 great-great-great-granddaughter of Jan and Veronica Lewandowska Maciejewski–so we obviously have Maciejewski and/or Lewandowski ancestors in common. I wanted to learn more about our connection.

His family was from Long Island, New York. From the family tree he posted online, I could see that his mother’s family was not Polish. His father’s ancestors were Polish, so that was our likely connection. The census records for his father’s father’s parents consistently said they had come from Russian-Poland. The Maciejewski family had come from West Prussia, so that was not a link to our shared heritage. I started looking for information about his father’s mother’s family.

I found a link to his grandparents’ 1950 wedding announcement in a Long Island paper. The article titled “Nassau Summer Brides” identified the bride’s parents as Mr. and Mrs. Theodore Jurek. When I searched for Theodore Jurek in census records, I was surprised to learn that in his early years, he had lived on the same street in Buffalo, New York, as my great-grandmother Veronica Maciejewska and her family!

So here is the tale of two families…

In December 1883, Jan and Weronika Lewandowska Maciejewski immigrated to Buffalo, New York, with their infant Antoni. The family grew with the arrival of Konstanty (August), Wiktorya (Dorota), Marya, Anna, and Ludwik. Jan and Weronika had been married in 1869 in Kościół św. Jana Chrzciciela, Nieżywięć, West Prussia.

In 1888, Jan and Teofila Rossa Jurek also immigrated to Buffalo, New York, with their daughters Władysława and Marianna. In Buffalo, they had Franciszek and Stanisława. I was able to find a baptism entry for Stanisława at St. Adalbert’s Roman Catholic Church in Buffalo in 1890, which showed that her parents had been born in Posen (Poznań in Polish).

1890 Stanislawa Jurek birth cropped

1890 Baptism Record, St. Adalbert’s RC Church, Buffalo, New York

The Poznan Project has indexed the marriages from the parishes of this region, and a search for Jan Jurek and Teofila found their marriage in Kościół pw. św. Wita (St. Vitus), the Catholic parish in Słupy, entry 8 / 1884:

  • Joannes Jurek (24 years old)
    father: Joseph Jurek , mother: Marianna Świtalska
  • Theophila Rossa (26 years old)
    father: Jacobus Rossa , mother: Anna Domagała

Słupy, Schubin, Posen, was approximately 66 miles from Nieżywięć, West Prussia. Both locations are currently in Kujawsko-Pomorskie, Poland.

Death of the Fathers

Sadly, the fathers of both these families met with untimely ends. Jan Jurek died in 1890. An article on the front page of the March 6, 1890 Buffalo Evening News has the entry “Killed by the Cars” saying that “Jan Jurek, a Polish laborer, tried to board a passing Central engine at the William street crossing at 7:30 this morning. He slipped and was killed. Coroner Tucker.”

1890 Jan Jurek death

1890 Buffalo Evening News

Jan Maciejewski died 30 Apr 1896, of endocarditis, and was buried at St. Stanislaus Cemetery, in Cheektowaga, New York.

1896 Jan Maciejewski Death Certificate

1896 Death Certificate, Buffalo, New York

Widows and Their Families

In the 1900 federal census, both women were listed as widows. Veronica Maciejewski was living at 242 Detroit Street, with her children Anthony (17), Constanty (15), Victoria (12), Mary (11), Ann (8), and Louis (5).

1900 Veronica Maciejewski census

1900 Maciejewski Census, Buffalo, New York

In 1900, Teofila Jurek was at 169 Rother Avenue with Wladislawa (14), Mary (13), Frank (11), Stanislawa (9), and Teofila’s mother, Anna Rosa (78).

1900-jurek-census-e1523386901598.jpg

1900 Jurek census, Buffalo, New York

Further research in church and civil records in Bobrowo and Słupy, Prussia, as well as Buffalo, New York, showed the birth dates for the children of these families.

Maciejewski Jurek

Children of Maciejewski and Jurek Families in Buffalo, New York

In 1905, the Jurek family lived at 160 Stanislaus Street: Teofila (41), Mary (18), Frank (16), Stella (14), and Anna (84).

1905 Jurek Rosa NYS census cropped

1905 New York State Census, Jurek Family, Buffalo, New York

The Maciejewski family lived at 303 Detroit Street in 1905: Veronica (55), Anthony (22), Konstanty (20), Victoria (18), Mary (16), Anna (13), and Louis (10).

1905 Veronica Maciejewski census

1905 New York State Census, Maciejewski Family, Buffalo, New York

Both women purchased homes on Goodyear Avenue. In the Buffalo Courier on August 21, 1905, under DEEDS—CITY was “Martin Hauck to Veronica Maciejewska, Goodyear Avenue, west side, 520 feet north Empire Street, 30 feet front, $1.”  On June 15, 1907, under MORTGAGES—CITY was the entryTeofila Jurek to Grace H. Selkirk, Goodyear Avenue. 385.69 feet south Sycamore Street. $2,000.”

1910 Census Records

There were more changes to the families. In the 1910 census, Thaddeus Jurek (2) had joined the Telofila Jurek family at 212 Goodyear Avenue, along with Frank (21), Maryanna (22), and Stella (19).

1910-jurek-census.jpg

1910 Jurek Census, Buffalo, New York

Władysława Jurek had married Szczepan Kubiak about 1903 and the couple were living with their four children Edward, Mary, Louisa, and Irene at 97 Koons Avenue for the 1910 census.

1910-kubiak-census-cropped-e1525812086918.jpg

1910 Kubiak Census, Buffalo, New York

On 5 Aug 1907, Antoni Maciejewski had married Marya Szczepańska in Bennington, New York. In the 1910 census, they and their daughters Sophia and Celia were living with his mother and his siblings Victoria (28), Mary (21), Anna (18), and Ludwik (15) at 127 Goodyear Avenue.

1910 Maciejewski census 4450075_00386

1910 Maciejewski Census, Buffalo, New York

On 5 Apr 1910, Konstanty Maciejewski had married Marya Kajdasz in Buffalo, New York, and the couple was living at 301 Mills Street. Konstanty was called Gust, and used the name August Warner in later years, as documented in How Did Maciejewski Become Warner?

1910 GustavMary Maciejewski census cropped

1910 Maciejewski Census, Buffalo, New York

Marianna Jurek Married Szczepan Kozłowski

In America, Telofila was called Tillie Jurek. She and her cat were featured in a story in the Buffalo Courier on 27 February 1915, “Destroys Two of Cat’s Lives and Draws Fine of $10 in City Court.”

1915 Tilli Jurek cat

1915 Buffalo Courier, Buffalo, New York

Tillie Rosa was listed as the bride’s mother when Mary Anna Jurek married Szczepan Kozłowski in the Polish National Catholic Church in Rochester, New York, on 18 Oct 1919.

1919 Kozlowski Jurek marriage

1919 Kozlowski-Jurek Marriage Record, Rochester, New York

In the 1920 census, Tadeusz Jurek, 12 years old, is listed as the nephew of Frank (31), living with his grandmother, Teofila (60), and Stanisława (28), at 212 Goodyear Avenue in Buffalo.

1920 Jurek census

1920 Jurek Census, Buffalo, New York

In the 1925 New York census, the Stephen and Mary Kozłowski family at 19 Pulaski Street in Rochester includes Theodore Jurek, age 18 and Frank Kozłowski, age 3.

1925 Kozlowski Jurek census

1925 Kozlowski-Jurek Census, Rochester, New York

Still at 19 Pulaski Street in Rochester in 1940, Stephen and Mary Kozłowski’s family included Frank (18), Richard (13), and Norma (10).

1940 Kozlowski census m-t0627-02848-00417

1940 Kozlowski Census, Rochester, New York

Mary (Jurek) Kozłowski died 1 Mar 1947 at her home, 19 Pulaski St. The account in the Rochester NY Democrat Chronicle of 4 March 1947 said she was survived by her husband, “one daughter Norma Kozlowski; three sons, Theodore of Hicksvllle, N. Y., Frank, and Cpl. Richard Kozlowski, U. S. Marine Corp.; one sister, Mrs. Lottie Kubiak; one brother, Frank Jurek, two granddaughters and one grandson; several nieces and nephews.”

When Frank Kozłowski died in 1961, his obituary in the Rochester NY Democrat Chronicle on 26 July 1961 stated “Survivors include his wife, two brothers, Theodore Jurek of Bethpage, L.I., and Deputy Sheriff Richard Kozlowski of Churchville; a sister, Norma Kozlowski of Brockport, and several nieces and nephews.”

Tadeusz/Theodore Jurek

Theodore Jurek joined the United States Army 29 Sep 1927. He married Helen Skszyba, daughter of Stanisław Skszyba and Marya Pliszka, who was born 23 Jan 1910 in Duryea, Luzerne, Pennsylvania, United States. The couple lived with their three children on Nassau Road in Hempstead, Nassau, New York in the 1940 federal census.

1940-theodore-jurek-census-m-t0627-02688-00584-e1527219384253.jpg

1940 Jurek Census, Hempstead, New York

Theodore Jurek’s military and Social Security records said he was born 21 Mar 1906 and died 2 Oct 1977. His last residence was listed as Bethpage, New York. He and his wife Helen were buried at Long Island National Cemetery.

Because in former generations, physical proximity was needed to create a baby, I have looked for common places where our known ancestors lived. Based on my “extremely high” AncestryDNA connections with his great-grandson and another Jurek descendant (208 centimorgans shared across 8 DNA segments, an estimated second cousin), and even more Maciejewski family descendants in common, we know the families are related. Perhaps additional research in Buffalo records and further analysis of DNA relationships will give more information about the identity of Tadeusz‘ father, but meanwhile, we remain DNA cousins.

Notes About Names

Polish names - Jurek

Because Polish people would speak the Polish language and give their children Polish names, they are the first names I have listed here. Other names listed in church and official records from Prussia may be in Latin or German, and names in American records may be either an English version of the same name (Ludwik/Louis), or an Americanized nickname (Władysława/Lottie).

 

 

 

Sources

https://myfamilyhistoryresearch.wordpress.com/2018/03/18/finding-new-cousins-with-dna-evidence/

“Nassau Summer Brides,” Nassau Review-Star, Freeport, New York, 3 July 1950, Page 5, col 1.

https://myfamilyhistoryresearch.wordpress.com/2018/02/20/maciejewski-family-arrived-in-new-york-21-december-1883/

https://myfamilyhistoryresearch.wordpress.com/2018/02/13/1883-birth-of-antoni-maciejewski-in-zgnilobloty-west-prussia/

https://myfamilyhistoryresearch.wordpress.com/2015/03/04/constantine-maciejewski-aka-august-warner-and-his-son-daniel-warner/

https://myfamilyhistoryresearch.wordpress.com/2015/04/21/marriage-of-johann-maciejewski-and-veronica-lewandowska-in-niezywiec-prussia/

St. Adalbert RC Church, Buffalo, New York, Church records, FHL microfilm, Family History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah, Stanisława Jurek.

Łukasz Bielecki, “Poznan Project,” database, Poznan Project (http://poznan-project.psnc.pl: accessed March 2018), Jurek – Rossa; citing church records or Urząd Stanu Cywilnego (Civil Registry Office).

“Killed by the Cars”, Buffalo Evening News, Buffalo, New York, 6 March 1890, page 1.

Buffalo, New York, death certificate no. 231 (1 May 1896), Jan Madjewski; City Clerk’s Office, City Hall, Buffalo, New York.

St. Stanislaus Bishop & Martyr RC Church (Buffalo, New York), , Death Register, 1896, Jan Maciejewski; FHL microfilm .

1900 Federal Census, United States, population schedule, Buffalo (city), New York, enumeration district (ED) 70, Veronica Maciejewski

1900 Federal Census, New York, population schedule, Buffalo Ward 14, Erie, New York, Anna Rosa

LDS Family History Library, “Bobrowo (Brodnica),” database, Kościół rzymsko-katolicki. Parafja, Family Search (familysearch.com: accessed February 2018), Anton Maciejewski; citing Germany, Preußen, Westpreußen, Bobrau – Church records.

LDS Family History Library, “Słupy (Szubin),” database, Kościół rzymsko-katolicki. Parafja, Family Search (familysearch.com: accessed 11 May 2018), Władysława and Marianna Jurek; citing Germany, Preußen, Posen, Slupy – Church records.

1905 New York State Census, New York, population schedule, Buffalo Ward 14, Erie, New York, USA, Anna Rosa

1905 New York State Census, New York, population schedule, Buffalo, New York, , Veronica Maciejewski

DEEDS Veronica Maciejewska, Buffalo Courier, Buffalo, New York, 21 August 1905, Page 8, column 4.

MORTGAGES Teofila Jurek, Buffalo Courier, Buffalo, New York, 15 June 1907.

1910 Federal Census, New York State, population schedule, Buffalo Ward 12, Erie, New York, Stephen Kubiak

1910 Federal Census, New York State, population schedule, Buffalo, New York, Veronica Maciejewski

Konstantyn Maciejewski and Mary Kajdasz, (5 April 1910), Marriage Record; Erie County Courthouse, Buffalo, New York.

1910 Federal Census, New York State, population schedule, Buffalo, New York, enumeration district (ED) 104, sheet 18, Gustav Maciejewski

https://myfamilyhistoryresearch.wordpress.com/2017/06/04/how-did-maciejewski-become-warner/

1910 Federal Census, New York State, population schedule, Buffalo Ward 12, Erie, New York, Teofila Jurek

“Destroys Two of Cat’s Lives and Draws Fine of $10 in City Court” Buffalo Courier, Buffalo, New York, 27 February 1915, page 6, column 2-3

New York, County Marriage Records, 1847-1849, 1907-1936 [database on-line]. Lehi, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2016.

1920 Federal Census, New York, population schedule, Buffalo Ward 16, Erie, New York, Teofila Jurek

1925 New York State Census, New York, population schedule, Rochester Ward 17, Monroe, Stephen Kozlowski

1940 Federal Census, New York, population schedule, Rochester, Monroe, New York, 19 Pulaski Street, Stephen Kozlowski

1940 Federal Census, New York, population schedule, Hempstead, Nassau, New York, Theodore Jurek

Mary Kozlowski, Democrat Chronicle, Rochester, New York, 4 March 1947, page 6.

Frank Kozlowski, Democrat Chronicle, Rochester, New York, 26 July 1961.

Social Security Administration, “U.S. Social Security Death Index,” database, Social Security Applications and Claims (: accessed December 2017), Helen Jurek, 053546980.

Social Security Administration, “U.S. Social Security Death Index,” database, Death Master File (: accessed February 2018), Theodore Jurek, 111-01-8499, before 1951.

US VA, National Cemetery Administration, “Nationwide Gravesite Locator,” database, US Department of Veteran Affairs (http://gravelocator.cem.va.gov/ : accessed January 2018), Theodore S Sr Jurek.

Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 11 May 2018), memorial page for Theodore S Jurek, Sr (21 Mar 1906–2 Oct 1977), Find A Grave Memorial no. 2718164, citing Long Island National Cemetery, East Farmingdale, Suffolk County, New York, USA ; Maintained by US Veterans Affairs Office (contributor 5) .

 

Kalinowska from Szembruk, West Prussia: Looking for Common Ancestors

Before finding my great grandparents’ ancestral village of Szembruczek, and confused by variations of Szombrug, Szömbrug, Szenbruk, Szenburg, Szönbruk, Szymbruczek, etc., in the baptism records of the children of my great grandparents Marcin Szczepański and Anna Kalinowska, I saw that two sisters who were my fourth cousin estimated DNA matches on Ancestry.com and GEDmatch also had an ancestor whose birth name was Kalinowska.

I exchanged messages with one of the sisters, and she said that according to American records, their great-great-grandmother was born Ludwika Kalinowska about 1844 and died in Chicago in 1926. Ludwika’s death certificate listed her place of birth only as Poland and her father’s name as Walter. She had been married twice. Ludwika’s first husband, the sisters’ great-great-grandfather, was Ludwik Kierznowski and her second husband was Franciszek Konracki. They thought Ludwika was a widow by the time she settled in Chicago with her three daughters. Another clue was that the sisters’ great-grandmother Katarzyna Kiersznowska Niewirowska spoke both German and Polish, an indication that she had come from Prussia, the German occupied part of Poland in the nineteenth century.

After Ludwika immigrated with her daughters to Chicago, her daughter Katarzyna Kiersznowska married Franciszek Niewirowski at St. Stanislaus Kostka Roman Catholic Church in Chicago, Illinois, on 27 November 1885. The church records, filmed by the Church of Latter Day Saints, are available online at FamilySearch, and the marriage record was very informative.

1885 marriage record Niewirowski Kiersznowski.jpg

1885 Marriage Record, St. Stanislaus Kostka RC Church, Chicago, Illinois

Franciszek Niewirowski, young man (Polish młodzian), 22 years old, has been in Chicago 1.5 years, and lives Blackhawk Street No. 78. He is the son (Polish syn) of Józef and Maryanna Brzozowska. He was born (Polish urodzony) at what reads like Szennato. (Czytać is the Polish verb “to read.”)

Katarzyna Kierznowska, young woman (Polish panna), 19 years old, has been in Chicago (illegible) No. 199. She is the daughter (Polish córka) of Ludwik and Ludwika. Her place of birth is listed as duży Szömbrug.

Katarzyna Kierznowska came from duży Szömbrug, also known as Groß Schönbrück or Szembruk in Polish, the same place as my great grandparents Marcin Szczepański and Anna Kalinowska!

In the scanned records from the LDS Church Family History Center on FamilySearch for  Sw. Bartłomieja (St. Bartholomew) parish in Szembruk, West Prussia, we were able to find:

  • Katarzyna Kierznowska‘s birth record 26 Nov 1864

1864 Kalinowski Kierznowska births

1864 Baptism Record, Katarzyna Kierznowska, Szembruk, West Prussia

  • her sister Marianna Kierznowska‘s birth record Jan 1868

1868 Kierznowska birth

1868 Baptism Record, Marianna Kierznowska, Szembruk, West Prussia

  • their father Ludwik Kierznowski‘s death record 17 Feb 1869

1869 Kierznowski death

1869 Death Record, Ludwik Kierznowski, Szembruk, West Prussia

  • Ludwika Kalinowska Kierznowska‘s marriage to Franciszek Konracki 9 Jan 1876

1876 marriage Konracki

1876 Marriage Record, Franz Konracki and Ludwika Kierznowska, Szembruk, West Prussia

  • the birth record for Rozalia Konracka 29 Sep 1876

1876 Rozalia Konracki birth

1876 Baptism Record, Rozalia Konracka, Szembruk, West Prussia

Unfortunately, we were not able to find birth records or the marriage record for Ludwik Kierznowski and Ludwika Kalinowska in earlier years, or any records for anyone named Władysław or Wacław Kalinowski.

My great-grandmother Anna Kalinowska was born in 1858 to Jan Kalinowski (b. 1824) and Marianna Nowakowska (b. 1835)

1858 Anna Kalinowska birth cropped

1858 Baptism Record, Anna Kalinowska, Szembruk, West Prussia

Jan Kalinowski and Marianna Nowakowska were married 31 Oct 1853. It was his second marriage, and he was 30 years old.

1853 Kalinowski Nowakowska marriage

1853 Kalinowski-Nowakowska Marriage Record, Szembruk, West Prussia

Going back thirty years, Jan Kalinowski‘s parents were Wojciech (Adalbert) Kalinowski and Anna Szynkowska

1819-1824 Kalinowski births

1819-1824 Children of Adalbert Kalinowski and Anna Szynkowska, Szembruk, West Prussia

The early register appears to be a catching up. Jan‘s sisters Marianna and Katarzyna are recorded on the same page.

In going through the Szembruk records, I found other members of this family either in birth, death, or marriage records. Although not complete or proven yet, here is what I have found of this family so far:

1-Wojciech KALINOWSKI (ca 1796-1 Oct 1852)
+Anna SZYNKOWSKA (-)
. . . . 2-Ewa KALINOWSKA (abt 1816-7 Sep 1826)
. . . . 2-Marianna KALINOWSKA (15 Aug 1819-2 Feb 1850)
. . . . +Frederick WERTHER (1817-)
. . . . . . . . 3-Agata WERTHER (abt 1840-5 Oct 1848)
. . . . . . . . 3-Eva WERTHER (Nov 1841-21 Nov 1841)
. . . . . . . . 3-Jan WERTHER (1847-15 Oct 1849)
. . . . 2-Justyna KALINOWSKA (1823-22 Feb 1833)
. . . . 2-Katarzyna KALINOWSKA (20 Dec 1823-)
. . . . +Józef KLUGIEWICZ (1821-)
. . . . 2-Jan KALINOWSKI (6 Jan 1824-)
. . . . +first wife  (-bef 1853)
. . . . +Marianna NOWAKOWSKA (21 Jan 1835-)
. . . . . . . . 3-Jan KALINOWSKI (11 Jan 1855-)
. . . . . . . . 3-Anna KALINOWSKA (27 Mar 1858-10 Sep 1938)
. . . . . . . . 3-Fabian KALINOWSKI (7 Dec 1862-)
. . . . . . . . 3-Marcin KALINOWSKI (9 Nov 1864-)
. . . . . . . . 3-Fabian KALINOWSKI (7 Dec 1867-)
. . . . . . . . 3-Józef KALINOWSKI (-20 Sep 1871)
. . . . 2-Dorota KALINOWSKA (1826-10 Feb 1853)
. . . . +MANIEWICZ (abt 1820-)
. . . . 2-Franciszek KALINOWSKI (abt Dec 1836-2 Apr 1837)
. . . . 2-Marcin KALINOWSKI (18 Oct 1838-10 Apr 1841)

To recap: We have DNA in common. We have ancestors that came from Szembruk, West Prussia. We have the same name in our family trees. It is possible, if unlikely, that Władysław or Wacław was a child of Wojciech and Anna. It is also possible that the name of her father on Ludwika‘s death certificate was incorrect, or that our mutual ancestor was even further back, or not a result of a documented union. Although the Kalinowski surname is suggestive of a connection, some of the 31 centimorgans shared across 2 DNA segments or 20.8 centimorgans shared across 1 DNA segment that we have in common could be shared from earlier as yet unknown ancestors in the Kierznowski, Niewirowski, or Brzozowski lines.

Sources

St. Stanislaus Kostka RC Church, Chicago, Illinois, Franciszek NIEWIEROWSKI and Katarzyna KIERZNOWSKA (Marriage), https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HY-DR53-QPL?i=414&cc=1452409&cat=411138

Szembruk, Poland, Katarzyna KIERZNOWSKA (Birth) https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CS8M-3CNP?i=186&cat=295340

Szembruk, Poland, Marianna KIERZNOWSKA (Birth) https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CS8M-3CNS?i=197&cat=295340

Szembruk, Poland, Ludwik KIERZNOWSKI (Death) https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CS8M-3ZZC?i=469&cat=295340

Szembruk, Poland, Franciszek KONRACKI and Ludwika KALINOWSKA (Marriage) https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CS8M-3HY7?i=311&cat=295340

Szembruk, Poland, Rozalia KONRACKI (Birth), https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CS8M-38PT?i=228&cat=295340

Szembruk, Poland, Anna KALINOWSKA (Birth), https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CS8M-3CLK?cat=295340

Szembruk, Poland, Jan KALINOWSKI and Marianna NOWAKOWSKA (Marriage) https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CS8M-3H1S?i=293&cat=295340

Szembruk, Poland, Jan KALINOWSKI (Birth) https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CS8M-3DQM?i=15&cat=295340