Discovering our Ancestors' Travels and Travails

Archive for the ‘Kapuscinski’ Category

Researching Świętokrzyskie Ancestors

Our maternal grandmother, Agnieszka Kapuscinska Skrok Kiec, was the only grandparent my younger sisters and I ever knew. Our grandfathers Jan Skrok and Antoni Maciejewski had both died in 1936, when our parents were only five and eight years old. Our father’s mother Marya Szczepańska Maciejewska died in 1951, four years before I was born.

Gnieszowice-Wikipedia
Gnieszowice, Koprzywnica, Sandomierz, Świętokrzyskie, Poland

I was curious about my grandmother’s origins, and the land of my ancestors. In 2004, I joined a group tour of Poland, then rented a car to visit Gnieszowice, the small village near Koprzywnica, Sandomierz, where documents indicated my maternal grandmother had been born in 1895. Although I was able to verify my grandmother’s birth in the former synagogue that had become the Archives in Sandomierz, I did not think I would be able to do much research in the Polish records.

That changed in March 2015, when I attended the Polish Genealogical Society of Massachusetts presentation by Julie Roberts Szczepankiewicz at the Chicopee Public Library on Locating Vital Records in Poland Using Online Resources, or, I Found My Village! Now What? She answered questions I did not know I had, and her detailed examples clearly illustrated her points. I was inspired.

Following her example, I used the Geneteka database of the Polish Genealogical Society (in Poland!) to find the birth records of my mother’s parents, their siblings, and their parents’ marriage records, indexed with their parents’ names. I learned how I was related to people I knew were cousins, but I was not sure how. Our ancestors came to Buffalo in the early part of the twentieth century from an area near Sandomierz, in the Russian occupied area of Poland, in what is now the Świętokrzyskie (Holy Cross) province. To the family names I knew from western New York–Kapuściński, Kasprzyk, Kiec, Kwiatek, Rzepka, Skrok, Szczepański, and Witoń–I was able to add my great-great grandparents and the names Kołek, Bartkiewicz, Zybała, and Kaczmarz to my family tree. Needless to say, I was pleased to make a donation to contribute to the volunteer site.

When I learned that Julie Roberts Szczepankiewicz was to give a presentation on Polish Genealogy Research to the Polish Genealogical Society of New York State at their April 2016 meeting in Buffalo, I encouraged PGSNYS members to attend. I also reached out to several of my DNA matches in western New York and nearby Canada.

Although one of my DNA matches from southern Ontario was unable to attend the presentation, we exchanged information. She had been adopted, but she knew the names of her birth parents. coin that Grandma Drach sewed to her hemHer birth father had even given her a tangible piece of her heritage, one of the coins that had been sewn into the interior hem of her ancestor’s dress when she left the country telling her that it was ‘not allowed’ to take monies out and that they ‘escaped’. 

My DNA match had found the ship manifests from her father’s parents’ arrivals in Canada, but she was not sure from where they had come. But I did! I had been down this road and I knew some of the signposts. And we’re family!

loniow
Suchowola, Osiek, and Świniary, Łoniów, near Gnieszowice, Koprzywnica; Google map

Her grandfather Józef Drach‘s ship record said he was born in Świniary, Sandomierz. There are 2 very small villages named Stare Świniary and Nowe Świniary approximately 3 kilometers south of Łoniów. In Polish, Stare means old, Nowe means new. Both villages are in the administrative district of Gmina Łoniów, within Sandomierz County, Świętokrzyskie, about seven kilometers from Gnieszowice, where my grandmother Agnieszka was born.

Drach
Józef Drach, ship Lituania from Danzig to Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, 1930

Józef‘s parents were identified as Jan and Katarzyna Drach. Jan is the Polish version of the English name John. Katarzyna is the Polish name for Katherine.

Geneteka had an indexed record that indicated that Jan Drach and Katarzyna Borycka married in  Łoniów in 1895 (entry #23), as well as listing the baptism of Józef Drach in Łoniów in 1905 (entry #27). The church in Łoniów is Kościół św. Mikołaja, St. Nicholas. While the record indices have been posted online, I did not find the original records.

My DNA match’s grandmother was Aniela Wieczorek. Her ship record said she was born in Suchowola, and her sister Katarzyna lived in Suchowola, Sandomierz. Today, Suchowola is a village in the administrative district of Gmina Osiek, within Staszów County, Świętokrzyskie Voivodeship. It is not far from Sandomierz.

The nearest church is Kościół św. Stanisława Biskupa i Męczennika, St. Stanislaus Bishop and Martyr, in Osiek. Since ship and Canadian records said that Aniela Wieczorek was born in 1900 or 1901, the most likely record is in 1900, entry 143.

1900 Aniela Wieczorek birth
Aniela Wieczorek birth record, 1900, Osiek, Urząd Stanu Cywilnego, Św. Stanisława

Aniela‘s nearest relative was listed as her sister Katarzyna Janoś (sp?).

aniela
Aniela Wieczorek, ship Melita from Warsaw, Poland, to Saint John, New Brunswick, Canada, 1924

 Katarzyna Wieczorek was a popular name, with baptisms of girls with that name occurring regularly in Osiek.

  • 1891  35
  • 1893  134
  • 1895  71
  • 1896  78
  • 1897  100
  • 1901  83

Although these records were available online, they were written in the Napoleonic format in Cyrillic, because this area was occupied by Russia in the 19th and early 20th century. I was not able to read the records myself, but my DNA match was able to use this information to extend her family tree to Michał Wieczorek and Franciszka Czech and beyond.

GEDmatch estimated the number of generations to our most recent common ancestor (MRCA) is 4.8, since we share a 19.1 centiMorgan DNA segment on chromosome 3. While we have not found our common ancestors, we found the common location where our ancestors lived.

loniow2
Zamek Krzyżtopór, Baranów Sandomierski, and Sandomierz, Świętokrzyskie, Poland, Google map

When traveling in Poland, I stayed at the hotel at Baranów Sandomierski Castle, across the Wisła (Vistula) River from our grandparents’ birth places. I also visited the towns of Sandomierz and Opatów, and Krzyżtopór Castle in Ujazd,  Iwaniska, Opatów, about 22 kilometers from Łoniów. I had read about these places in James Michener’s novel, Poland, and I was glad to make the connection to our family history in what is now Świętokrzyskie province.

Sources

Wikipedia contributors, “Gnieszowice,” Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Gnieszowice&oldid=771022160 (accessed December 18, 2018).

“Ancestry,” database, Ancestry (ancestry.com: accessed 12 December 2018), Jozef Drach; citing Passenger Lists. Jozef Drach, Male, 25, abt 1905, Poland, Departure Port: Danzig, Poland, Arrival date: 8 Apr 1930, Arrival Port: Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, Vessel: Lituania; Library and Archives Canada; Ottawa, Ontario, Canada; Series: RG 76-C; Roll: T-14825; Ancestry.com. Canadian Passenger Lists, 1865-1935 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2010. Library and Archives Canada, n.d. RG 76-C. Department of Employment and Immigration fonds. Library and Archives Canada Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.

Polskie Towarzystwo Genealogiczne, “Geneteka, Metryki,” database, Polish Genealogical Society, Genealodzy (genealodzy.pl: accessed 2016), Józef Drach; citing church records or Urząd Stanu Cywilnego (Civil Registry Office). 1905 27 Józef Drach Łoniów Łoniów [Indeks dodał: Wojciech_Liśkiewicz] .

Genealogiczne, Genealodzy, Jan Drach, Katarzyna Borycka. 1895 23 Jan Drach Katarzyna Borycka Łoniów [ Miejscowość: Łoniów] [Indeks dodał: Wojciech_Liśkiewicz] .

“Ancestry,” database, Ancestry, Aniela Wieczorek, Female, abt 1900, Birth Place: Suchowola, Age: 24, Date of Arrival: 12 Apr 1924, Port of Arrival: Saint John, New Brunswick, Port of Departure: Warsaw, Poland, Ship Name: Melita, Library and Archives Canada; Form 30A Ocean Arrivals (Individual Manifests), 1919-1924; Rolls: T-14939 – T-15248; Ancestry.com. Canada, Ocean Arrivals (Form 30A), 1919-1924 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2009. Library and Archives Canada. Form 30A, 1919-1924 (Ocean Arrivals). Ottawa, Ontario, Canada: Library and Archives Canada, n.d.. RG 76. Department of Employment and Immigration .

Towarzystwa Genealogicznego Centralnej Polski, Birth, Aniela Wieczorek; digital images, Towarzystwa Genealogicznego Centralnej Polski (http://metryki.genealodzy.pl : accessed December 2018). 1900 143 Aniela Wieczorek Osiek Osiek [Indeks dodał: Jabłoński_Edward]

Towarzystwa Genealogicznego Centralnej Polski, Marriage, Jan Czosnek, Franciszka Cech; digital images, Towarzystwa Genealogicznego Centralnej Polski (http://metryki.genealodzy.pl : accessed December 2018). 1880 3 Jan Czosnek Franciszka Cech Osiek [ Miejscowość: Osiek] [Indeks dodał: Jabłoński_Edward]

Towarzystwa Genealogicznego Centralnej Polski, Marriage, 1890 4, Michał Wieczorek Franciszka Czosnek; digital images, Towarzystwa Genealogicznego Centralnej Polski (http://metryki.genealodzy.pl : accessed December 2018). 1890 4 Michał Wieczorek, Franciszka Czosnek Osiek [ Miejscowość: Osiek] [Indeks dodał: Jabłoński_Edward]

Michener, James A. Poland. Random House, 1983

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Mastykarz Family in Lackawanna, New York

My maternal grandmother’s sister Maryanna Kapuścińska married Grzegorz Mastykarz in Lackawanna, Erie, New York, in 1915. Their children were my mother’s first cousins, and we all saw each other most often at weddings and funerals.

In researching this family, I encountered the Mastykarz name spelled various ways: Masteka, Mastyka, Mastykas, Mastykaj, etc., which made me wonder about the actual spelling of the name, and from where the family had come. American records indicated they were from Galicia, or the Austria-Hungary occupied part of Poland before the first World War. Galicia was the poorest province of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, and because people from here often had little formal education, their names were often recorded phonetically.

The Słownik nazwisk współcześnie w Polsce używanych, or Dictionary of Surnames Currently Used in Poland, by Professor Kazimierz Rymut, shows these names starting with Masty-  that were listed in Poland in 1990:

NazwiskoOgólna liczbaRozmieszczenie
Masty1Rz:1
Mastyga53Go:5, Ka:8, Ks:3, Op:20, Sz:4, Wr:13
Mastyj63BB:2, Cz:5, Ka:17, Kr:4, Ks:9, Rz:16, Ta:10
Mastyjan14Ko:14
Mastyk21Ka:1, Ks:4, Pr:1, Tb:2, Wb:3, Wr:10
Mastyka42Wa:6, Cz:1, Gd:4, JG:5, Kr:2, Ks:17, Pr:1, Ta:1, Wr:5
Mastykarz56BB:1, By:1, Gd:17, Ka:6, Kr:4, Ol:1, Op:2, Pl:5, Su:10, Sz:7, Wb:1, Za:1
Mastyla11Kr:11
Mastylak24Ol:14, Sz:10
Mastylarek00
Mastylarz1Ka:1
Mastyła48Ko:42, Ks:4, Sł:2
Mastyło37Ko:15, Ol:9, Po:2, Sz:4, Tb:3, Za:4
Mastyna107Wa:4, Bs:13, Ka:8, Ki:66, Kr:5, Ol:11
Mastyniuk00
Mastynow00
Mastyń00
Mastyński3Po:2, Wr:1

 

Poland_administrative_division_1975_literki

Polish Provinces, 1975-1999

Mastykarz looks like the Polish spelling used most often. While Mastykarz was found in many places in Poland, in 1990 it was found more often in these former provinces:

  • Gd: Gdańsk: 17
  • Ka: Katowice: 6
  • Pł: Płock: 5
  • Su: Suwałki: 10
  • Sz: Szczecin: 7

Both Michał and Grzegorz lived in Lackawanna, Erie, New York. Grzegorz‘ descendants shared these pictures of the Mastykarz brothers, reporting that Grzegorz is on the left and Michał is on the right in each picture. The third man may be Józef Solowski, who married Maryanna Kapuścińska Mastykarz‘s cousin Maryanna Witoń in Buffalo in 1915.

Mastykarz men

Photographs of Grzegorz and Michał Mastykarz  (possibly Józef Solowski), circa 1915

Records indicate that Michał Mastykarz traveled between Europe and the United States several times. I was able to find ship manifests for travel to America in 1908 and 1911 as a “non immigrant alien.”  He did not intend to stay in the United States, but came for a  limited time as a visitor (tourist) or a temporary worker.

Michał Mastykas came to the United States on 4 Nov 1908 to New York, New York, United States on the ship Blücher from Hamburg, Germany. The record said that Michał had been in the United States before, in 1902 1906, in Buffalo, New York, but I did not find the records.

1908 Michael Mostykas marked

1908 Ship Blücher from Hamburg, Germany 23 October

1908 Michael Mostykas 2 marked

1908 Ship Blücher arrived in New York 4 November

His entry in the ship manifest was stamped as a “non immigrant alien” traveling to Buffalo with Adolf Niedziela to his father Jan Niedziela, who was described as an acquaintance of Michał. The US ship manifest listed Michał‘s wife Victoria, and show Michał came from Skidziń and Adolf Niedziela from Przecieszyn in Austria.

1908 Michal Mastykas Hamburg marked

1908 Hamburg, Germany, ship manifest

Skidziń and Przecieszyn correlate with the Hamburg record that said they were from Oświęcim (Auschwitz in German). From the First Partition of Poland in 1772 to after World War I, this area was in the Austrian Kingdom of Galicia. From 1975 to 1998, this area was administratively part of the Katowice province. Today both villages are in the administrative district of Gmina Brzeszcze, within Oświęcim County, województwo małopolskie (Lesser Poland Voivodeship) in southern Poland.

Michał appeared in the census in 1910 as a boarder at 431 Center Street in Lackawanna, Erie, New York, United States. He was 35 years old, married for 8 years, from Austrian Poland. The record said he was an alien who had arrived in the United States in 1902. He spoke Polish, and was a furnace helper, probably in a foundry, a factory that produces metal castings. It was reported he could neither read nor write.

1910 Michael Mastyksz cropped

1910 census, Lackawanna, New York

In 1911, Michał was a “non immigrant alien” going to Buffalo on the ship Main, which sailed from Bremen, Germany on 31 August and arrived in New York on 12 Sep 1911. He left behind his wife, Wiktorya Mastykarz, in Skidziń, which was also listed as his place of birth. He had been in the United States 1909 1911, and was going to meet a friend, John Bier***a in Buffalo, New York.

1911 Michal Mastyharz ship1

1911 Ship Main from Bremen, Germany 31 August

1911 Michal Mastyharz ship2

1911 Ship Main arrived in New York 12 September

Although Michał was with Gregory and Mary Mateka in the January 1920 census, it appears that he returned to the old country. His name was found on a manifest of the ship Cedric of the White Star Dominion Line, traveling from New York, New York, arriving 6 Feb 1920 in Liverpool, England, United Kingdom.

1920 Michal Mastykan marked

1920 Ship Cedric from New York, arriving 6 Feb 1920 in Liverpool, England, United Kingdom.

While the Polish name Michał is Michael in other languages, Grzegosz often used the name George in America, although there was much variation in spelling of both of his names in many records. First Names of the Polish Commonwealth: Origins & Meanings, by George W. Helon and William “Fred” Hoffman, had this entry for Grzegorz.

grzegorz-name.jpg
Grzegorz. First Names of the Polish Commonwealth: Origins & Meanings,
by George W. Helon and William “Fred” Hoffman (1998)

Grzegorz Mastykarz came to United States on the ship Hannover, which set sail from Bremen, Germany, on on 25 July and arrived 7 Aug 1912 at the port of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The ship manifest said he was a farm laborer who had come from Germany, and was going to his brother Michał at 110 Lee Street in Buffalo. His ticket had been paid for by his brother.

1912-gregorz-mastykarz-ship-manifest-marked

1912 Ship Hannover from Bremen, Germany, 25 July

1912 Gregorz Mastykarz ship manifest marked2

1912 Ship Hannover arrived in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 7 August

Wikipedia says that Landwehr, or Landeswehr, is “a German language term used in referring to certain national armies, or militias found in nineteenth- and early twentieth-century Europe. In different context it refers to large-scale, low-strength fortifications.”

Although Grzegorz‘ last residence was Germany, his nationality was listed as Ruthenian. His place of birth in the ship manifest looks something like Borswa Hora (?) in Galicia. Some of his descendants think that his place of birth may have been Cieszanów, Galicia (Austria Poland), or somewhere in what is now the Ukraine. It is more likely Borowa Góra, which in Ukrainian is pronounced Borova Hora, a village in the administrative district of Gmina Lubaczów, near the Ukrainian border. Borowa Góra is approximately 11 kilometers southeast of Cieszanów, which was the county seat. Both are currently in the Podkarpackie Voivodeship (województwo podkarpackie) of Poland.

Grzegorz married Marya Kapuscinska in Lackawanna, New York, on 3 February 1915. I found the record in the Erie County Courthouse, in Buffalo, New York, in the 1990s. Allowing for possible errors in transcription, the marriage record for Gzegor Mastyka and Mary Kapuscinska listed his mother as “Hajia Oguodnit.” I believe he may have said something like “Helcia Ogrodnik.” Helcia is the Polish diminutive for Helena, Ogrodnik means gardener in Polish.

His father’s name looked like “Bascel” on their marriage certificate, which could be Bazyli or Bazyl in Polish, the equivalent of the English name Basil or Basel. Hoffman and Helon had this entry for Bazyli in First Names of the Polish Commonwealth: Origins & Meanings.

Bazyli

Bazyli. First Names of the Polish Commonwealth: Origins & Meanings,
by George W. Helon and William “Fred” Hoffman (1998)

George and Mary Masstacz were in the New York State census on 529 Ingham Avenue in Lackawanna, Erie, New York, in June 1915.

1915 Masstacz marked

1915 New York State census, George and Mary Masstacz, Lackawanna, New York (full page)

Their American born daughter Mary, one year old, was with them.

1915 Masstacz cropped

1915 New York State census, George and Mary Masstacz, Lackawanna, New York

In 1918, Grzegorz registered for the World War I draft as George Mustek, making his mark with an X. His date of birth was listed only as 1880. He was living with his wife Mary at 116 Rich St. in Lackawanna, was medium height and build, and he had blue eyes and brown hair.

1918 George Mustek 005262607_04461

George Mustek World War I draft registration, 1918

In the 1920 census, Gregory and Mary Mateka were at 116 Rich Street in Lackawanna, Erie, New York, with their children Mary, Joseph, and Stanley. Michael was listed as a 46 year old boarder, an alien who had arrived in 1914.

1920 Gregory and Mary Mateka census.jpg

1920 census record, Gregory and Mary Mateka, Lackawanna, New York

This 1925 census record from their farm in Evans, Erie, New York, was a bit mixed up:

1925 Mastykarz census cropped

1925 New York State census record, Mastykarz and Mary Grzegorz [sic], Evans, Erie, New York

Grzegorz Mastykarz and Maryanna Kapuścińska had the following children:

  • Maryanna, born 1914, New York, United States; married Bronisław Harzynski; died 8 Nov 1968.
  • Józef was born on 16 Feb 1916 in New York, United States. Józef died in an accidental drowning after falling from a raft on 18 Jun 1926 at the age of 10 at Blackwell Canal on Tifft Farm in Lackawanna, Erie, New York, United States. He was buried at Holy Cross Cemetery in Lackawanna, Erie, New York, United States.
  • Stanisław Józef, born 5 Nov 1918, New York, United States; married Justina Covino, 21 Nov 1940; died 3 Jan 2004, Wilmington, New Castle, Delaware, United States. This couple changed their name to Masters in the 1940s.
  • Jan Edward, born 11 Aug 1922, New York, United States; married Josephine Marie Bosco, 22 Jun 1946; died 16 Nov 2000, Lake View, Erie, New York, United States.

Maryanna Kapuścińska had arrived in the United States on 27 Jan 1912. She filed first papers (declared her intention to become a citizen) in 1928, and was naturalized as an American citizen in Buffalo, Erie, New York, on 12 Sep 1932.

1932 Mary Mastykarz naturalization cropped

Mary Mastykarz Naturalization Card, Buffalo, New York

1976 mary mastykarz obit

Front Page, Hamburg, New York, 19 August 1976

Maryanna‘s actual birth date is uncertain. A December 1888 birth record from Poland may be hers or possibly an older sister named Maryanna who died before her birth. Her age was listed as twenty-two on the ship manifest in January 1912. She filed for Social Security in 1963 and 1966 with different birth dates.

  • Mary Ann Mastykarz [Mary Ann Kapusczynski] Birth Date: 5 Dec 1890 Birth Place: Poland Father: Wincenty Kapusczynski Mother: Mary Witan SSN: 086383718 May 1963
  • Mary Mastykarz SSN: 067-42-6618 Last Residence: 14218 Buffalo, Erie, New York  BORN: 8 Dec 1891 Died: Aug 1976 SSN issued: New York (1966)

 

On 29 October 1941, Grzegorz Mastykarz‘ death notice was published in Dziennik dla Wszystkich, “Everybody’s Daily,” the Buffalo, New York, Polish daily newspaper from 1911 to 1957.

1941 Grzegorz Mastykarz 29 Oct Dniennik

Dziennik dla Wszystkich, 29 Oct 1941

  On Tuesday, October 28th 1941 at 7:45 in the morning, he departed this earth.

In holy remembrance of
Grzegorz Mastykarz.

  The late Grzegorz was born in Poland. He lived at 161 Ingham Avenue in Lackawanna, New York.

  Funeral services will be on Thursday, October 30th, 1941, at 9:00 a.m. at the chapel of Piotr Pasiecznik, at 303 Ridge Road at the corner of Ingham Avenue, Lackawanna, New York, to St. Hyacinth Church at 9:30 a.m. and then on to Holy Cross Cemetery, Lackawanna, New York.

  For this sad ritual family and friends are invited in mourning.

Marja (born Kapuścińska), wife; Stanisław and Jan sons; Marjanna, daughter; Bronisław Harzynski, son-in-law; Justina (Covina) daughter-in-law, grandson and granddaughter.

 

 

https://images.findagrave.com/photos/2014/38/124803867_1391863996.jpg

Mastykarz gravestone, Holy Cross Cemetery, FindaGrave photograph

Sources

By Halibutt, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=3154253

Ancestry.com. New York, Passenger and Crew Lists (including Castle Garden and Ellis Island), 1820-1957 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010. Citing Passenger Lists of Vessels Arriving at New York, New York, 1820-1897. Microfilm Publication M237, 675 rolls. NAI: 6256867. Records of the U.S. Customs Service, Record Group 36. National Archives at Washington, D.C.

“Ancestry,” database, Ancestry (ancestry.com: accessed 24 October 2018), Michael Mostykas; citing Passenger Lists. Staatsarchiv Hamburg. Hamburg Passenger Lists, 1850-1934 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2008. Citing Staatsarchiv Hamburg, Bestand: 373-7 I, VIII (Auswanderungsamt I). Mikrofilmrollen K 1701 – K 2008, S 17363 – S 17383, 13116 – 13183.

1910 Federal Census, New York State, population schedule, Lackawanna Ward 2, Erie, New York, Michael Mostyksz; digital images, Heritage Quest Online (www.heritagequestonline.com : accessed August 2016). Year: 1910; Census Place: Lackawanna Ward 2, Erie, New York; Roll: T624_939; Page: 17A; Enumeration District: 0280; FHL microfilm: 1374952

Ancestry, Michal Mastyharz. Year: 1911; Arrival: New York, New York; Microfilm Serial: T715, 1897-1957; Microfilm Roll: Roll 1737; Line: 29; Page Number: 211. Citing: Ancestry.com. New York, Passenger and Crew Lists (including Castle Garden and Ellis Island), 1820-1957 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010.

 “UK, Incoming Passenger Lists, 1878-1960,” digital images, Ancestry.com (http://ancestry.com : accessed 28 November 2018), Michael Mostykan. The National Archives of the UK; Kew, Surrey, England; Board of Trade: Commercial and Statistical Department and successors: Inwards Passenger Lists.; Class: BT26; Piece: 668

Pennsylvania Philadelphia, “Passenger Lists,” database, FamilySearch, National Archives and Records Administration (familysearch.org: accessed August 2016), Gregorz Mastykarz, 1912; citing ship manifests.

“Pennsylvania, Philadelphia Passenger List Index Cards, 1883-1948,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:KFDX-JHW : 12 December 2014), Gregorz Mastykarz, 1912; citing Immigration, NARA microfilm publication T526 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.); FHL microfilm 1,380,289.

New York State, Marriage Index, 1881-1967. Gzeyner Masztyka, Mary Kapuscienska, Certificate Number: 1951, New York State Department of Health; Albany, NY, USA.

New York State Vital Records Index, Cert. No. 1951, Mastyka-Kapuscinska.  Gzegor Masztyka, Mary Kapuscinska, (3 February 1915), Marriage Record: ; Erie County Courthouse, Buffalo, New York.

1915 New York State Census, New York State, population schedule, Lackawanna Ward 01, A.D. 07, E.D. 01, Erie, New York, United States, , George Mastykarz; FHL microfilm “New York State Census, 1915,” database, FamilySearch  (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:K9NB-PHZ : 8 November 2014), Mary Miasstacz, Lackawanna Ward 01, A.D. 07, E.D. 01, Erie, New York, United States; from “New York, State Census, 1915,” database and images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : 2012); citing p. 51, line 45, state population census schedules, 1915, New York State Archives, Albany.

“World War I Draft Registration Cards,” database, Ancestry.com (: accessed November 2018), George Mustek; citing World War I Selective Service System Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration. M1509, 4,582 rolls.

1920 Federal Census, New York, population schedule, Lackawanna Ward 2, Erie, New York, Gregory Mateka; digital images, HeritageQuest (heritagequestonline.com : accessed November 2018).

1925 New York State Census, New York, population schedule, Evans, Erie, , Mastykoz Grzegorsz; FHL microfilm. New York State Archives; Albany, New York; State Population Census Schedules, 1925; Election District: 02; Assembly District: 08; City: Evans; County: Erie; Page: 28 Ancestry.com. New York, State Census, 1925 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012.

Playmates Silent as Parents search for Boy Who Drowned, Buffalo Courier Express, Buffalo, New York, 21 June 1926, page 1.

New York State Vital Records Index, Death Cert. No. 38660, Joseph Mastykaz.

Towarzystwa Genealogicznego Centralnej Polski, 158/D- Akta stanu cywilnego parafii rzymskokatolickiej w Koprzywnicy, 1888 #239, Maryanna Kapuscinska birth record; digital images, Towarzystwa Genealogicznego Centralnej Polski (http://metryki.genealodzy.pl : accessed 22 March 2015).

Social Security Administration, “U.S. Social Security Death Index,” database, Social Security Applications and Claims (: accessed 7 August 2015), Mary Ann Mastykarz, , 1963. Ancestry.com. U.S., Social Security Applications and Claims Index, 1936-2007 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2015.

Social Security Administration, “U.S. Social Security Death Index,” database, Death Master File (: accessed 2 October 2018), Mary Mastykarz, 067-42-6618, 1966. Ancestry.com. U.S., Social Security Death Index, 1935-2014 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2014.

Mary Mastykarz, , U.S. District Court for the Western District of New York; 1907-1966; National Archives and Records Administration, Washington, D. C. “New York, Western District, Naturalization Index, 1907-1966,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XPH2-ZPK : 6 December 2014), Mary Mastykarz, 1932; from “Alphabetical Index to Petitions for Naturalizations of the US District Court for the Western District of New York, 1907-1966,” database, Fold3.com (http://www.fold3.com : n.d.); citing U.S. District Court for the Western District of New York, NARA microfilm publication M1677 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), roll 11.

MASTYKARZ-Mary [nee Kapuscienski], Front Page, Hamburg, New York, 19 August 1976.

MASTYKARZ RITES HELD THURSDAY, Lackawanna Leader, Lackawanna, New York, 6 November 1941, page 1, column 8.

DEATHS Oct 28 George Mastykarz, 58, 161 Ingham.  Grzegorz Mastykarz, Dziennik dla Wszystkich [Everybody’s Daily], Buffalo, New York, 29 October 1941.

Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 26 November 2018), memorial page for Gezegus Mastykarz (unknown–28 Oct 1941), Find A Grave Memorial no. 124803867, citing Holy Cross Cemetery, Lackawanna, Erie County, New York, USA ; Maintained by Find A Grave (contributor 8).

“Cabbage” Patch Kids: Kapusta/Kapuściński DNA Cousins

I find genetic connections fascinating. They are clues, like anything else, and need research and documentation. I recently reached out to a DNA match on Ancestry.com. Although we were only distantly related, with 9.6 centimorgans shared across 1 DNA segment, we both had the Kapuscinski name in our family trees and ties to Buffalo, New York. I wanted to learn if we shared common ancestors, or could identify a place where our common ancestors had been.

His ancestors were also identified as Kapusta. Although I knew that Kapusta and Kapuściński had the same root word, this was the first family I had seen using both versions of the name.

name Kapus

Entry from William F. “Fred” Hoffman’s Polish Surnames: Origins and Meanings, 2001

It was not surprising that there could be different versions of the same Polish name. The Polish language changes words to indicate gender, number, and case. For example,

  • the -ski ending indicates an adjective, for possession or affiliation
  • -ska is the feminine form of the adjective
  • -owski/-owska indicates the place of
  • -owa is the ending used for a wife’s name
  • -ówna is an unmarried daughter, etc.

So the same root name can have various endings, depending how it is used by a Polish speaker. For more about Polish names, see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polish_name.

Agnes Kapuscinska chart

Ancestors of Agnieszka Kapuścińska

My grandmother Agnieszka Kapuścińska was born in February 1895 in Gnieszowice, Koprzywnica, near Sandomierz in Russian Poland. Now it is in the Świętokrzyskie province of Poland. Her sister Maryanna had come to the United States in 1912, and paid for her sister’s ticket the following year. Maryanna married Grzegosz Mastykarz in 1915, and Agnieszka married Jan Skrok in 1917. While I had previously identified my grandmother’s ancestors, and had been able to trace the sisters, I did not know of any other relatives named Kapuściński in Buffalo, New York.

However, I found Casimir and Mary Kapuszcinski in Buffalo, New York, in the 1930 United States Federal Census, at 73 Gibson Street.

1930 Kapuszcinski census cropped

1930 census record, Casimir and Mary Kapuszcinski, Buffalo, New York

In 1940, Casimir and Mary Kapusta were at 37 Lombard Street, in Buffalo, New York.

1940 Kapusta census cropped

1940 census record, Casimer and Mary Kapusta, Buffalo, New York

The older children had been born in Ohio, which made me look for information there. I found the 15 Oct 1928 marriage record for Kazimir Kapusta and Mary Staron, born Obora. Both had been previously married, and had been divorced, in Cleveland, Ohio.

1928 marriage Kapusta cropped

1928 Marriage Record, Kazimir Kapusta and Mary Staron, Warrensville, Ohio

In the 1920 census record, Casimer Kapusta was a lodger in the home of Walenty and Mary Starol [sic] at 3472 East 76th Street in Cleveland, Ohio.

1920 Kapuscinski census cropped

1920 census, Walenty and Mary Starol and Casimer Kapusta, Cleveland, Ohio

Walenty Staron married Victoria Falkowska in Shaker Heights, Ohio, on 23 Oct 1928. His naturalization record in 1944 identified his children and previous residence in Sandomierz, Poland.

1944 Staron naturalization children

1944 Naturalization Petition, Walenty Staron, Cleveland, Ohio

Born in Cleveland, Ohio, Maryanna Obora‘s children with Walenty Staron were

  • Szczepan (1915-1982)
  • Marta  (1917-2005)
  • Kazimiera  (1919-2018)
  • Czesław  (1921-1945)

The children of Kazimierz Kapusta and Maryanna Obora born in Buffalo, New York, were

  • Edward Jerome  (1927-2007)
  • Alfred  (1929-1932)
  • Richard J.  (1931-    )
  • Genevieve/Jean  (1933-2017)

Genevieve/Jean‘s grandson was my DNA match, so I wanted to see if we could find where in Poland his great-grandparents had been born, and if there were any links to my identified ancestors. We exchanged information on his other grandparents, but I was most interested in his Kapusta and Obora lines from Russian Poland.

1918 Kapusta WWI draft cropped

WWI Draft Registration Form, Kazimierz Kapusta, Cleveland, Ohio

Kazimierz‘ 1918 draft registration identified him as a “frendley alien” born in 1894 in “Bialobozie, Kelecska, Russia.” (Already, spelling is suspect.) Because I knew where my Kapuściński ancestors were from in the former Kielce province, it helped me to find Białoborze.

Wikipedia says “Białoborze is a village in the administrative district of Gmina Stopnica, within Busko County, Świętokrzyskie Voivodeship, in south-central Poland. It lies approximately 3 kilometres (2 mi) north-east of Stopnica, 18 km (11 mi) east of Busko-Zdrój, and 55 km (34 mi) south-east of the regional capital Kielce.”

A search on the Geneteka database for Kazimierz Kapusta in the Świętokrzyskie province showed that Kazimierz Kapusta  was born in 1894 in Białoborze to Jan Kapusta and Katarzyna Sikora, which matched the information on his marriage record. He was baptized (entry #66, according to the Geneteka index) at Kościół św. Apostołów Piotra i Pawła in Stopnica, not far from the area near Sandomierz where my Kapuściński ancestors were found. The Polish records were indexed, but I did not find the records themselves online.

From Geneteka, I could see Jan Kapusta and Katarzyna Sikora had these children in Białoborze. Unfortunately, the first boy, named Jan, died in 1891.

1891       41         Jan Kapusta
1892       53         Apolonia Kapusta
1894       66         Kazimierz Kapusta
1896       121       Jan Kapusta

Further research on Geneteka showed that

  • Jan Kapusta and Katarzyna Sikora were married in Stopnica (Skrobaczów) 1889.08.14.
  • Jan Kapusta was the son of Walenty Kapusta and Apolonia Lech.
  • Katarzyna Sikora was the daughter of Wojciech Sikora and Agnieszka Pawłowska.

Jan Kapusta, son of Walenty Kapusta and Apolonia Lech, died in 1897 (Stopnica entry 63) in Białoborze. On 1899.08.24, Katarzyna Kapusta (born Sikora) married Andrzej Jaros (Jarosz), the son of Ignacy Jaros and Antonina Włoch.

 

1913 Obora cropped

1913 Manifest for the ship Campania from Liverpool, England, to New York, New York

Maryanna Obora immigrated on 17 Feb 1913 to New York, New York, United States, on the ship Campania from Liverpool, England, with a final destination of Cleveland, Ohio. Her place of birth was listed as Dzieslawice in Russian Poland.

Wikipedia says “Dziesławice is a village in the administrative district of Gmina Stopnica, within Busko County, Świętokrzyskie Voivodeship, in south-central Poland.” Often immigrants who were married in the new country had previously known each other or each other’s families in the old country, as was the case here. Again, Geneteka was useful.

Marianna Obora was born in 1896 in Dziesławice to Wojciech Obora and Marianna Pyrz. Again, this was very close to the information on her marriage record. She was baptized (entry #256, according to the Geneteka index) at Kościół św. Apostołów Piotra i Pawła in Stopnica. As before, the Polish records were indexed, but I did not find the records themselves online.

From Geneteka, I could see Wojciech Obora and Marianna Pyrz had these children in Dziesławice. Sadly, the records say that Stanisław [sic] died in 1900 and Antoni in 1905.

1896       256         Marianna
1899       121         Stanisława
1904       11           Antoni
1906       102         Stanisława
1908       60           Józefa

Further research on Geneteka showed that

  • Wojciech Obora and Marianna Pyrz were married in Stopnica (Falęcin – Dziesławice) 1895.05.15.
  • Wojciech Obora was the son of Jan Obora and Marianna Wróbel.
  • Marianna Pyrz was the daughter of Kacper Pyrz and Franciszka Kania.

jean.jpg

Ancestors of Genevieve/Jean Kapuscinski

Our DNA connection is very small, and we do not have any common matches, so I was not surprised my DNA match and I did not find common ancestors in a few generations. But our forebears came from the same region, and I was able to put my prior experience with Geneteka to good use in identifying the ancestors of one of the grandmothers of my DNA match. Even genetically distant cousins can collaborate and share information to help one another find out more about their ancestors!

Sources

Hoffman, William F. Polish Surnames: Origins and Meanings. Chicago, Illinois : Polish Genealogical Society of America. 1993, Second Edition, Revised 2001.

“Polish name.” Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, 9 Aug. 2018. Web. 16 Aug. 2018.

1930 Federal Census, New York, population schedule, Buffalo, Erie, New York, USA, Casimir Kapuszcinski; digital images, HeritageQuest (heritagequestonline.com : accessed 13 August 2018).

1940 Federal Census, New York, population schedule, Buffalo, Erie, New York, Casimir Kapusta; digital images, HeritageQuest (heritagequestonline.com : accessed 13 August 2018).

Ancestry.com. Cuyahoga County, Ohio, Marriage Records and Indexes, 1810-1973 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010.

1920 Federal Census, Ohio, population schedule, Cleveland Ward 14, Cuyahoga, Ohio, Casimer Kapusta; digital images, HeritageQuest (heritagequestonline.com : accessed 13 August 2018).

Ohio, State Marriage Registers, Marriage, Walenty Staron, Victoria Falkowska, 23 October 1928.

Ancestry.com. Ohio, Naturalization Petition and Record Books, 1888-1946 [database on-line]. Lehi, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011.

“World War I Draft Registration Cards,” database, Ancestry.com (: accessed 13 August 2018), Kazimirz Kapusta; citing Ohio; Registration County: Cuyahoga; Roll: 1831773.

“Passenger Lists,” database, The Statue of Liberty – Ellis Island Foundation, Ellis Island (www.libertyellisfoundation.org: accessed 13 August 2018), Kazimierz Kapusta; citing ship manifests.

Polskie Towarzystwo Genealogiczne, “Geneteka, Metryki,” database, Polish Genealogical Society, Genealodzy (genealodzy.pl: accessed 13 August 2018); citing church records or Urząd Stanu Cywilnego (Civil Registry Office).

Chain Migration

Since my grandparents had been married in the United States, I had thought that they had met here and that their families had not known one another back in Poland. Instead, as I discovered more about my specific ancestors, I learned that often descendants of families who had been known to each other in the old country would later marry and continue on family traditions in the new country. Their story of immigration and allied families is a tradition that continues today.

Family history researchers refer to this tendency of people from a place to travel together and to bring their families with them as chain migration.

My father’s grandparents had immigrated to Buffalo in the 1880s, when my grandfather Antoni Maciejewski was just a baby. My grandmother Marya Szczepańska was born in Buffalo. I was surprised to learn that their parents had been born half a world away in Nieżywięć and Szembruczek, small villages in West Prussia that were just twenty miles apart. Although I thought I had solved a puzzle when I learned that my great-grandfather Marcin Szczepański‘s mother was born to the Kaniecki family, I subsequently learned that Jan Kaniecki‘s mother had been born Kalinowska, and he was probably first cousin to my great-grandmother, Anna Kalinowska Szczepanska. My father and his siblings called him “Uncle.” There are undoubtedly other family ties that have been lost in the intervening years.

My mother’s parents, Agnieszka Kapuscińska and Jan Skrok, moved to the United States in the 1910s with their siblings, cousins, and other relations.  They married in Buffalo, returned to Poland about 1920, and then came back to America later that decade. Although her grandmother had lived in Buffalo for almost ten years, my mother never met her or other family members who later remained in Poland. Because my aunt and uncle had been born in the United States, they were “anchor babies” who allowed my Polish-born grandmother to travel back to America with an United States passport that included an infant who had been born in Poland. My grandparents subsequently had several more children in America, including my mother.

Many genealogists have used chain migration to identify their family members, but The Legal Genealogist Judy G. Russell, JD, CG, CGL, expresses our family situation best in her blog post “For the record…What “chain migration” looks like”.

Yet though these immigrants personally may not ever have fully assimilated in the United States, they most assuredly contributed directly and personally to this country.

In many cases, they married here in America.

They worked long and hard here in America.

They paid taxes here in America.

They sent their children to school here in America.

They — and their children — and grandchildren — and great grandchildren — are my family.

And their children — and grandchildren — and great grandchildren — most assuredly are fully assimilated and contribute directly and personally to this country.

We have served this nation in the United States Army, Air Force, Marines and Navy.

In the civilian service of the United States and of several states.

In the ranks of the medical profession. The legal profession. As educators. As scientists.

As parents.

And even as grandparents.

This is what my family looks like.

We are precisely what “chain migration” really looks like.

And we’re damned proud of it.

St. Stanislaus RC Cemetery, Cheektowaga, New York

The final resting place for many of our relatives is  St. Stanislaus Roman Catholic Cemetery, Cheektowaga, just outside of Buffalo, Erie, New York, United States.

Our parents John and Estelle Skrok Maciejewski are buried there, as is our sister who was stillborn. All four of our grandparents are buried there: Antoni and Marya Szczepanski Maciejewski and Jan Skrok and Agnes Kapuscinski Skrok Kiec. Originally buried  separately, our grandmother’s second husband Adam Kiec is now interred with his first wife,  Stella Skrok Kiec. Our great grandparents, Jan Maciejewski and Veronica Lewandowski Maciejewski are also buried there, as are many aunts and uncles and cousins and other family.

This list is not complete, but if you want to pay your respects to those who came before us, please check the names and cemetery maps below.

2 May 1896 Jan Maciejewski
14 Nov 1907 Władysław Szczepański
Jun 1917 Alojzy Maciejewski
1918 Joanna Beresniewicz
Mar 1928 Józefina Skrok
18 Jul 1929 Józef Malinowski Sect A, Line 22, Grave 14 (9)
bef 1930 Stanisław Luczak
Aug 1930 Ryta Maciejewska Section I, Line 30, Grave 39
Apr 1931 Lukasz Jankowski Section AA
1931 Maryanna Derenda Malyszka
Oct 1935 Anastazya Matecka Jankowski Section AA
18 May 1936 Jan Skrok
28 Nov 1936 Antoni G. Maciejewski Section FF, Line 7, Grave 38
22 Nov 1938 Stanisława Skrok Kiec daughter Helena moved her parents’ remains together to Mausoleum
Aug 1939 Franciszek W. Szczepański Circle 3
Nov 1939 Barbara Zalewska Kiec
7 Apr 1941 Eugeniusz Maciejewski Section FF, Line 22, Grave 70
24 Nov 1942 Stefania Ryta Szczepański Ignasiak Circle 3, Line 30, Grave 6
Nov 1942 Martyna Ignasiak Circle 3, Line 30, with her mother
Dec 1943 Weronika E. Lewandowska Maciejewski Section BB, Lot 171, Grave 1
18 Mar 1947 Anna Stephania Szczepański Stanton
22 May 1947 Adam Kiec daughter Helena moved her parents’ remains together to Mausoleum
Apr 1948 Wiktorya Dorota Maciejewska Section BB, Lot 171, Grave 2
Dec 1948 Marya Gabryelewicz Szczepanski Circle 3
1948 Zofia Kalinska Beresniewicz Nowa II Plot
Jul 1950 Michał Szalkiewicz
1951 Jan Beresniewicz
10 Apr 1951 Maryanna Szczepańska Maciejewski Section FF, Line 7, Grave 38
10 Nov 1952 Telesfor Teodor Malinowski Sect II, Line 329, Grave 2
26 Nov 1957 Stanisław Józef Szczepański
13 Mar 1958 Ryta Wnęk Section K, Line 143, Grave 6
Nov 1959 Stanisław Kiec
14 Nov 1959 Salomea Zieliński Rzepka
9 May 1964 Józef Edward Wnęk Circle 3, Line 30, Grave 4
4 Sep 1968 Władysław Kiec
Sep 1968 Baby Girl Maciejewski Section W, Line 3, Grave 62
Mar 1969 Apolonia Kwasniewcki Łuczak
9 Apr 1969 Jan Rzepka
1 Oct 1970 Marya Magdalena Maciejewska Section BB, Lot 171, Grave 3
26 Apr 1971 Maryanna Witoń Solowski
17 Dec 1973 Michael Bernard Maciejewski Crucifixion, No. 1, Lot 10, Line 7, Grave 2
Feb 1975 Anna Bonaventura Maciejewska
Feb 1976 Katarzyna Gajewska Skrok
Jan 1977 John J. Feduski
23 Jul 1977 Helena Agnieszka Skrok Szalkiewicz/ Stewart
15 Oct 1977 Agnieszka Kapuścińska Skrok Kiec
1977 Antoinette Karkowski Feduski
3 Apr 1978 Bronisław Bicio
Feb 1979 Stanisław J. Kiec
Nov 1980 Stanisława Solowska Wronski
13 Oct 1981 Jan H. Szalkiewicz Stewart
6 May 1985 Antoni Jan Maciejewski St. Casimir, Lot 1312, Grave 1
17 Oct 1985 Bernard Jan Maciejewski Crucifixion No. 1, Lot 10, Line 7, Grave 4
4 Nov 1988 Wladyslaw Beresniewicz Sect. Mt Kolbe, Lot 315, Grave 4
26 Jan 1991 Agnieszka D. Szczepański Wnek Circle 3, Line 30, Grave 5
Jul 1992 Szczepan Wilhelm Kiec
28 Nov 1992 Stanisław Kiec
Dec 1992 Czesław Jan Skrok
Apr 1994 Tadeusz Wincenty Skrok
Jan 1995 Józef Mruk
1 Sep 1995 Jan Marcin Maciejewski St. Casimer, Lot 1159, Grave 4
4 Feb 1997 Łucja J. Szczepański Mruk Marian Mausoleum, Crypt #68E
26 May 1999 Władysława A. Łuczak Maciejewski Crucifixion, No. 1, Lot 10, Grave 3
26 Feb 2000 Marya Szczepański
8 Feb 2001 Helena E. Kiec Goń Mausoleum
20 Jul 2002 Cecylia Anna Maciejewski Malinowski Sect II, Line 329, Grave
26 Sep 2002 Joyce Carol Manka Darlak
24 Oct 2003 Helena Elżbieta Malczewski Maciejewski St. Casimir, Lot 1312, Grave 2
6 Dec 2005 Imelda Teresa Maciejewski Lewandowski Sect II, Line 329, Grave
20 Apr 2006 Stanisława Zuzanna Skrok Maciejewski St. Casimir, Lot 1159, Grave 3
24 Apr 2006 Józef A. Goń Mausoleum
8 Nov 2008 Józefa M. Solowska Bicio
6 Feb 2016 Adele A. Winiarczyk Kiec
unknown Arthur J. Feduski

 

The “old” cemetery was east of Pine Ridge Road, while the new sections of the cemetery and the cemetery office are west of Pine Ridge Road.

St. Stan Cemetery - new

“New”  St. Stanislaus RC Cemetery, Cheektowaga, New York

St. Stan Buffalo Cemetery - old area_0002

“Old”  St. Stanislaus RC Cemetery, Cheektowaga, New York

Eighteenth Century Ancestors

I never thought I would ever be able to find our ancestors born in the 18th century, but here is an ancestor chart for our grandmother Agnieszka Kapuścińska that shows the Kapuściński and Witoń families going back to the late 1700s.

agnieszka kapuscinski ancestors

I was very happy to find the record for her parents’ marriage and obtaining the translation for the 1887 Marriage of Wincenty Kapuściński & Maryanna Witoń of Gnieszowice, a village near Koprzywnica.

Both of Agnieszka’s grandmothers married sons of Tomasz Witoń and Regina Sadowa. The older brother Walenty Witoń was Agnieszka’s maternal grandmother Regina Zybała‘s second husband. Unfortunately, Regina Zybała Tomczyk Witoń Kapuścińska was Three Times a Widow. Her third husband, Kazimierz Kapuściński, was our great-great-grandfather. See the 1857 Marriage of Kazimierz Kapuściński & Regina Witoń (née Zybała). The younger brother Kacper Witoń married Agnieszka’s maternal grandmother, Teresa Kaczmarek.

The 1832 Marriage of Florian Kapuściński & Franciszka Bokwa identified the grandparents of Kazimierz Kapuściński from Zarzece and Sośniczany, villages near Koprzywnica.

The 1820 Marriage of Tomasz Witoń and Regina Sadowa identified the grandparents of Kacper Witoń. Although both Tomasz and Regina resided in “the village of Zarzece Wiejskie in the parish of Koprzywnica in the county of Staszów in the Province of Sandomierz” when they married, Tomasz Witoń was baptized in the parish of Miechocin and born in the village of Chmielów in the Austrian Galicia in the Rzeszów province while Regina Sadowa and her parents formerly resided in the village of Zarzece Błonie małe.

1832 Marriage of Florian Kapuściński & Franciszka Bokwa

1832 Florian Kapuscinski Franciszka Bokwa marriage

18. The village of Zarzece.

This happened in the city of Koprzywnica on the twentieth of February in the year one thousand eight hundred thirty two at ten o’clock before noon. We announce that, in the presence of witnesses Paweł Sulicki from Zarzece and Marcin Grądziel from Sośniczany, peasants who are of age; on this day a religious marriage was contracted between Florian Kapuściński, a widower, a son of Stanisław and Gertruda nèe Wilga, twenty eight years old, residing in the village of Zarzece with his father on a farm; and between Franciszka Bokwa, a maiden, a daughter of Michał and Katarzyna nèe Sulicka, eighteen years old, residing in Sośniczany with her parents. This marriage was preceded by three readings of the banns on the fifth, the twelfth, and the nineteenth of February in the current year in the parish of Koprzywnica, as well as oral consent of parents of both newlyweds present at the ceremony was given. No impediment to the marriage arose. The newlyweds announced that they have made no prenuptial agreement. This record was read to the declarants, it was signed by us, none of the newlyweds or witnesses is able to write. [signature]