Discovering our Ancestors' Travels and Travails

Archive for the ‘Poland’ Category

Kaniecki Family: From West Prussia to Buffalo, New York

Jan, Rozalia, and Anna Kaniecki emigrated on 9 Apr 1882 from Hamburg, Germany, on the German ship Rhenania of the Hamburg-Amerikanische Packetfahrt-Actien-Gesellschaft (HAPAG) Hamburg America Line. The German record listed Jan‘s occupation as arbeiter (worker), and his age as 30. His wife Rosalie was 33, and their daughter Anna was 10 months old.

1882 Hamburg passenger list, ship Rhenania left Hamburg 9 Apr 1882

The Hamburg passenger list indicates they came from Roggenhausen, which was was a village in Graudenz, Marienwerder, Westpreußen, Preußen, 5 kilometers (3.2 miles) from Klein Schönbrück/Szembruczek, the village where Martin Szczepański and Anna Kalinowska originated.

1882 ship Rhenania arrived in New York 27 Apr 1882

The Kaniecki family arrived in the Port of New York 27 Apr 1882. They were listed alongside the Szczepański family in the 1892 New York State census in Buffalo, Erie, New York.

Wikipedia says:



Rogóźno (German: Roggenhausen) is a village in Grudziądz County, Kuyavian-Pomeranian Voivodeship, in north-central Poland. It is the seat of the gmina (administrative district) called Gmina Rogóźno.

The settlement lies in the historic Chełmno Land, approximately 12 kilometres (7 mi) north-east of Grudziądz and 60 km (37 mi) north of Toruń. In 2011 the village had a population of 946.

St. Adalbert Church, Rogóźno

The church in Rogóźno is Kościół Świętego Wojciecha Biskupa i Męczennika w Rogóźnie, St Adalbert, Bishop and Martyr. The church registers were filmed by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints as Roman Catholic parish register of baptisms, marriages and deaths for Roggenhausen, West Prussia, Germany; now Rogóźno (Grudziądz), Bydgoszcz, Poland. Text in Polish, Latin and German and are available online and at a Family History Center.

1874 Marriage of Johann Kaniecki and Rozalia Krause, Roggenhausen/Rogóźno, West Prussia

Jan Kaniecki and Rozalia Krause were married on 23 Aug 1874 in Roggenhausen/Rogóźno. His age was listed as 25 and hers as 26. Martin Kalinowski and M. Ziburtowicz were witnesses.

1846 birth record, Rozalia Krause, Roggenhausen/Rogóźno, West Prussia

Rozalia Krause was born in Roggenhausen/Rogóźno on 17 Jan 1846 to Marianne Krause and baptized 29 Mar 1846.

1950 birth record, Jan Kaniecki, Groß Schönbrück/Szembruk, West Prussia

Jan Kaniecki was born 16 Aug 1850 and baptized 16 Aug 1850 in Groß Schönbrück/Szembruk. His parents were Wojciech Kaniecki and Marianna Kalynowska.   

1949 marriage record, Wojciech Kaniecki and Marianna Kałynowska, Groß Schönbrück/Szembruk, West Prussia

Wojciech Kaniecki and Marianna Kałynowska were married 11 November 1849 in Groß Schönbrück/Szembruk, West Prussia. Wojciech was 25 years old, so he would have been born about 1824. Marianna was 24 years old, so she would have been born about 1825. Witnesses were Wojciech Kałynowski and Andreas (Andrzej in Polish) Kaniecki.

Ancestors of Anna Kaniecka

Jan Kaniecki‘s mother was born Marianna Kalinowska, so she was probably related to Anna Kalinowska Szczepanska‘s father Jan Kalinowski in the old country, but we do not yet know how.

Sources

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Finding Common Kalinowski Ancestors in Prussia!

I first submitted my DNA for testing in 2015, and only had a few matches. But more people tested and by late 2018, I was able to identify more than two dozen of my known relatives who had tested with Ancestry DNA. That is, I knew who they were, and how we were related. All were descendants of known immigrant ancestors to Buffalo and western New York.

I had explored our lineage with several other DNA cousins. In some cases we successfully identified their ancestors’ places of origin near Sandomierz in Russian Poland or Szembruk, West Prussia, even if we could not identify our most recent common ancestor(s).

So it was exciting when a fourth cousin and I were able to confirm our common ancestors across the pond! AncestryDNA reported that we shared 38 centiMorgans across 3 segments of DNA, and predicted our relationship would be fourth cousins. However, her ancestors had immigrated to Chicago, Illinois, and mine to Buffalo, New York. Our shared matches indicated we were related through my paternal grandmother’s Szczepanski and/or Kalinowski ancestors.

Although my DNA match’s Ancestry family tree was sparse with only four people, I recognized the Klugiewicz surname. In Polish Surnames: Origins and Meanings, author William “Fred” Hoffman explains that the Polish name Klugiewicz is derived from the German word klug meaning clever. The suffix -iewicz is a Polish patronymic/metronymic, indicating the offspring of, so according to their name, these are the descendants of a clever person.

My great-great-grandfather’s sister Katarzyna Kalinowska, born 20 Dec 1823 in Schönbrück, had married Józef Klugiewicz on 26 Oct 1846 in Groß Schönbrück, Graudenz, Marienwerder, Westpreußen, Preußen. Today it is Szembruk, Rogóźno, Grudziądz, in the Kuyavian-Pomeranian Voivodeship in Poland.

1846 Klugiewicz Kalinowska marriage marked

1846 marriage register, Sw. Bartłomieja, Groß Schönbruck, Graudenz, Westpreußen
1846 Klugiewicz Kalinowska marriage cropped

1846 Marriage, Joseph Klugiewicz and Catharina Kalinowska, Szembruk, West Prussia

Was my DNA match a descendant?

Her father’s Social Security application record offered the first clue, identifying his father as John Klusiewicz, probably a transcription error for John Klugiewicz.

Name: Paul John Klugiewicz
[Paul Klugiewicz]
Gender: Male
Race: White
Birth Date: 19 Dec 1926
Birth Place: Chicago Cook, Illinois
Death Date: May 1981
Father: John Klusiewicz
Mother: Marie Sikorski
SSN: 353129254
Notes: 08 Dec 1983: Name listed as PAUL JOHN KLUGIEWICZ; 30 Dec 1987: Name listed as PAUL KLUGIEWICZ

Born in 1926, Paul lived at 2929 Springfield Avenue, Chicago, Cook, Illinois, with his parents John and Marie Klugiewicz in 1930, and with his parents and siblings at 185 South Whipple Street, Chicago, in the 1940 census.

1940 Klugiewicz cropped

1940 federal census, John and Marie Klugiewicz, Chicago, Cook, Illinois

John Klugewicz married Marianna Sikorska 18 Nov 1925. According to her 13 Feb 1929 naturalization petition as Marie Evelyn Klugiewicz, she was born 22 Jul 1905 in Gobin, Poland, and arrived in the United States 18 Nov 1908.

John Klugiewicz‘s entry in the Social Security Death Index identified his date of birth as 24 Jun 1902, which matched the census records. He died in May 1980.

Name: John Klugiewicz
SSN: 323-10-2615
Last Residence:
60030 Grayslake, Lake, Illinois, USA
BORN: 24 Jun 1902
Last Benefit: 60030, Grayslake, Lake, Illinois, United States of America
Died: May 1980
State (Year) SSN issued: Illinois (Before 1951)

John was in the 1910 census at 2229 Ridgeway Avenue in Chicago, Illinois, with his parents Frank and Jennie Klugiewicz. Frank is an Americanized version of the Polish name Franciszek. Jennie is an American name for the Polish name Johanna.

1910 Klugiewicz cropped

1910 federal census, Frank and Jennie Klugiewicz, Chicago, Cook, Illinois

Franciszek Klugiewicz married Johanna Sztral on 17 Sep 1889 at St. Stanislaus Kostka Church in Chicago, Illinois. The church record said that Franciszek was 24 years old, a resident for 2 years, living at 665 Noble, the son (syn) of Józef and Katarzyna K[a]linowska, born (urodzony) in Szembruk. [1]

Johanna Sztral was 19 years old, a resident for 8 years, living at 261 Walenic (sp?), the daughter (córka) of Jędrzej Sztral and Marjanna Zaremba. Joanna‘s place of birth was near Szembruk in West Prussia. In the Roggenhausen/ records, her father’s name was Johann Strahl, and he and Marianna Zaremba were married in  on 10 Feb 1861.

1889 Klugiewicz Sztral marriage close

1889 Marriage record, Franciszek Klugiewicz and Joanna Sztral, St. Stanislaus Kostka Church, Chicago, Illinois

Frank Klugiewicz died 16 Oct 1943 in Chicago. Illinois death records also show Frank‘s parents were Joseph Klugiewicz and Catherine Kalinowski.

Name: Frank Klugiewicz
Birth Date: abt 1872
Death Date: 16 Oct 1943
Death Place: Chicago, Cook, Illinois
Death Age: 71
Gender: Male
Father Name: Joseph Klugiewiez
Mother Name: Catherine Kalinowski
Spouse Name: Johanna
FHL Film Number: 1953889

The Church of Latter Day Saints (LDS) filmed the early Parish registers of births, marriages, and deaths of the Catholic church, Sw. Bartłomieja (St. Bartholomew) in “Groß Schönbruck (Kr. Graudenz), Westpreußen, Germany; now Szembruk (Grudziądz), Bydgoszcz, Poland. Text in Latin, Polish and German.

Franz Klugiewicz was born 6 Oct 1864 to Joseph Klugiewicz and Catharina Kalinowska. He was baptized 16 Oct 1864 at Kościół św. Bartłomieja in Szembruk/Groß Schönbruck. Franz is the German form for the Polish name Franciszek. Catholic churches in Prussia listed Latin, German, and Polish names in their records.

1864 Franz Klugiewicz birth marked

1964 baptism record, Franz Klugiewicz, Sw. Bartłomieja, Groß Schönbruck, Graudenz, Westpreußen

In some of the earliest entries of the parish, three of the children of Adalbert Kalinowski and Anna Szynkowska were listed sequentially. Marianna was born in 1819, Catharina in 1823, and Joannes in 1824.

1819-1824 Kalinowski births

1819-1824 baptism records, Marianna, Catharina, and Joannes, children of  Adalbert (Wojciech) Kalinowski and Anna Szynkowska, Sw. Bartłomieja, Groß Schönbruck, Graudenz, Westpreußen

Adalbert is the Latin form for the Polish name Wojciech. Catharina is the Latin form for the Polish name Katarzyna. Joannes is Latin for the German name Johann and the Polish name Jan, or John in English. Since our ancestors were Polish and spoke the Polish language, I use their Polish names as primary, and list other names they used in my records.

Here is a graphical representation of our relationship, going back to our great-great-great-grandparents Wojciech Kalinowski and Anna Szynkowska, through the siblings Katarzyna and Jan Kalinowski, whose children Franciszek Klugiewicz and Anna Kalinowska Szczepańska immigrated to America in the 1880s.

klugiewicz

As predicted by the Ancestry DNA estimate, we really are fourth cousins!

[1] Other DNA matches’ great-grandparents, Katarzyna Kiersznowska and Franciszek Niewirowski, married at St. Stanislaus Kostka Roman Catholic Church in Chicago, Illinois, on 27 November 1885. Although Katarzyna‘s mother had been born Ludwika Kalinowska about 1844, we could not find her birth record or a common ancestor, although we did find other family records in Szembruk and nearby Szynwałd. See Kalinowska from Szembruk, West Prussia: Looking for Common Ancestors and Szennato, Szynnato? Szynwałd, Groß Schönwalde! Deciphering Polish/Prussian Place Names.

Sources

“LDS Family History Library, “Szembruk (Grudziądz),” database, Kościół rzymsko-katolicki. Parafja, Family Search (familysearch.com: accessed 2018), Joseph Klugiewicz and Catharina Kalinowska; citing Germany, Preußen, Westpreußen, Groß Schönbrück – Church records.

Social Security Administration, “U.S. Social Security Death Index,” database, Social Security Applications and Claims (: accessed 25 December 2018), Paul John Klugiewicz, Ancestry.com. U.S., Social Security Applications and Claims Index, 1936-2007 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2015.

1930 Federal Census, Illinois, population schedule, Chicago, Cook, Illinois, USA, Paul J Klugewicz; digital images, HeritageQuest (heritagequestonline.com : accessed 25 December 2018). Year: 1930; Census Place: Chicago, Cook, Illinois; Page: 10A; Enumeration District: 1345; FHL microfilm: 2340208.

1940 Federal Census, Illinois, population schedule, Chicago, Cook, Illinois, Paul Klugiewicz; digital images, HeritageQuest (heritagequestonline.com : accessed 25 December 2018). Year: 1940; Census Place: Chicago, Cook, Illinois; Roll: m-t0627-00966; Page: 8A; Enumeration District: 103-1450

Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 20 July 2018), memorial page for Paul J. Klugiewicz (1926–1981), Find A Grave Memorial no. 130212066, citing Highland Memorial Park, Libertyville, Lake County, Illinois, USA ; Maintained by Joseph Slak (contributor 47751241) .

Social Security Administration, “U.S. Social Security Death Index,” database, Death Master File (: accessed 25 December 2018), John Klugiewicz, 323-10-2615, before 1951. Ancestry.com. U.S., Social Security Death Index, 1935-2014 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2014.

“Ancestry,” database, Ancestry (ancestry.com: accessed 26 December 2018), Marianna Sikorski; citing Passenger Lists. Year: 1908; Arrival: New York, New York; Microfilm Serial: T715, 1897-1957; Microfilm Roll: Roll 1169; Line: 23; Page Number: 78

“Bremen Passenger Lists,” database, Bremen Chamber of Commerce and the Bremen Staatsarchiv, Gesellschaft für Familienforschung e.V. Bremen (http://www.public-juling.de: accessed 26 December 2018), Marianna Sikorski; citing Passenger Lists. Staats Archiv Bremen; Bremen, Germany; Bremen Passenger Lists; Archive Number: STAB_4,57/5-65_M

Bremen Passenger Lists (the Original). Staats Archiv Bremen. http://www.passengerlists.de/: accessed 3 March 2014.

Mrs Marie Evelyn Klugiewicz, Petition Number: 71208, , Illinois; 1907-1966; National Archives and Records Administration, Washington, D. C. National Archives at Chicago; Chicago, Illinois; ARC Title: Illinois, Petitions for Naturalization, 1906-1991; NAI Number: 593882; Record Group Title: Records of District Courts of the United States, 1685-2009; Record Group Number: RG 21 Naturalization Records. National Archives at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois.

Illinois, State Deaths and Stillbirths, Deaths, File Number: 45421, Marie Evelyn Klugiewicz, 15 August 1979; Division of Vital Records, Springfield, Illinois. Cook County Clerk. Cook County Clerk Genealogy Records. Cook County Clerk’s Office, Chicago, IL: Cook County Clerk, 2008.

“PGSA Database,” database, Polish Genealogical Society of America, (pgsa.org: accessed 26 December 2018), Frank Klugiewicz, Joanna Sztral; citing Polish church records.

Illinois State Deaths and Stillbirths, Death, Frank Klugiewicz. “Illinois Deaths and Stillbirths, 1916–1947.” Index. FamilySearch, Salt Lake City, Utah, 2010. Index entries derived from digital copies of original records.

LDS Family History Library, “Szembruk (Grudziądz),” database, Kościół rzymsko-katolicki. Parafja, Family Search (familysearch.com: accessed 28 December 2018), Franz Klugiewicz; citing Germany, Preußen, Westpreußen, Groß Schönbrück – Church records.

“PGSA Database,” database, Polish Genealogical Society of America,  (pgsa.org: accessed 26 December 2018), Dziennik Chicagoski  Franciszek Klugiewicz; citing Polish church records. Death Records – Dziennik Chicagoski Death Notices 1930-1971

“PGSA Database,” database, Polish Genealogical Society of America,  (pgsa.org: accessed 26 December 2018), PRCUA Insurance Franciszek Klugiewicz. Claim Date 16 Oct 1943, Claim Number 41849, Data Records – Polish Roman Catholic Union of America Insurance Claim Records (PRCUAInsurance)

Illinois Cook County Marriages 1871-1920, Marriage, Frank Klugewicz, Johanna Stia. Ancestry.com. Cook County, Illinois, Marriages Index, 1871-1920 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011. Illinois Department of Public Health records. “Marriage Records, 1871–present.” Division of Vital Records, Springfield, Illinois.

“PGSA Database,” database, Polish Genealogical Society of America,  (pgsa.org: accessed 26 December 2018), Frank Klugiewicz, Joanna Sztral. St. Stanislaus Kostka

1910 Federal Census, Illinois, population schedule, Chicago Ward 27, Cook, Illinois, Johny Klugiawicz; digital images, HeritageQuest (heritagequestonline.com : accessed 25 December 2018). Year: 1910; Census Place: Chicago Ward 27, Cook, Illinois; Roll: T624_270; Page: 40A; Enumeration District: 1190; FHL microfilm: 1374283

1930 Federal Census, Illinois, population schedule, Frank Klugiewicz Year: 1930; Census Place: Chicago, Cook, Illinois; Page: 26A; Enumeration District: 1344; FHL microfilm: 2340208

1940 Federal Census, Illinois, population schedule, Chicago, Cook, Illinois, , Frank Klugiewicz. Year: 1940; Census Place: Chicago, Cook, Illinois; Roll: m-t0627-00991; Page: 3A; Enumeration District: 103-2175

LDS Family History Library, “Roggenhausen (Graudenz),” database, Kościół rzymsko-katolicki. Parafja, Family Search (familysearch.com: accessed 30 December 2018), Joanna Strahl; citing Germany, Preußen, Westpreußen, Roggenhausen – Church records.

“PGSA Database,” database, Polish Genealogical Society of America,  (pgsa.org: accessed 26 December 2018), Dziennik Chicagoski  Joanna Klugiewicz  (Strahl). Death Records – Dziennik Chicagoski Death Notices 1930-1971

LDS Family History Library, “Roggenhausen (Graudenz),” database, Kościół rzymsko-katolicki. Parafja, Family Search (familysearch.com: accessed 30 December 2018), https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSZL-891G-N?i=294&cat=307697, Johann Strahl and Marianna Zarembka.

Illinois State Deaths and Stillbirths, Death, John Strahl. Ancestry.com. Cook County, Illinois, Deaths Index, 1878-1922 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011. Illinois, Cook County Deaths 1878–1922.” Index. FamilySearch, Salt Lake City, Utah, 2010. Illinois Department of Public Health. “Birth and Death Records, 1916–present.” Division of Vital Records, Springfield, Illinois.

“LDS Family History Library, “Szembruk (Grudziądz),” database, Kościół rzymsko-katolicki. Parafja, Family Search (familysearch.com: accessed 2018), Marianna, Catharina, and Joannes, children of  Adalbert Kalinowski and Anna Szynkowska; citing Germany, Preußen, Westpreußen, Groß Schönbrück – Church records.

Researching Świętokrzyskie Ancestors

Our maternal grandmother, Agnieszka Kapuscinska Skrok Kiec, was the only grandparent my younger sisters and I ever knew. Our grandfathers Jan Skrok and Antoni Maciejewski had both died in 1936, when our parents were only five and eight years old. Our father’s mother Marya Szczepańska Maciejewska died in 1951, four years before I was born.

Gnieszowice-Wikipedia
Gnieszowice, Koprzywnica, Sandomierz, Świętokrzyskie, Poland

I was curious about my grandmother’s origins, and the land of my ancestors. In 2004, I joined a group tour of Poland, then rented a car to visit Gnieszowice, the small village near Koprzywnica, Sandomierz, where documents indicated my maternal grandmother had been born in 1895. Although I was able to verify my grandmother’s birth in the former synagogue that had become the Archives in Sandomierz, I did not think I would be able to do much research in the Polish records.

That changed in March 2015, when I attended the Polish Genealogical Society of Massachusetts presentation by Julie Roberts Szczepankiewicz at the Chicopee Public Library on Locating Vital Records in Poland Using Online Resources, or, I Found My Village! Now What? She answered questions I did not know I had, and her detailed examples clearly illustrated her points. I was inspired.

Following her example, I used the Geneteka database of the Polish Genealogical Society (in Poland!) to find the birth records of my mother’s parents, their siblings, and their parents’ marriage records, indexed with their parents’ names. I learned how I was related to people I knew were cousins, but I was not sure how. Our ancestors came to Buffalo in the early part of the twentieth century from an area near Sandomierz, in the Russian occupied area of Poland, in what is now the Świętokrzyskie (Holy Cross) province. To the family names I knew from western New York–Kapuściński, Kasprzyk, Kiec, Kwiatek, Rzepka, Skrok, Szczepański, and Witoń–I was able to add my great-great grandparents and the names Kołek, Bartkiewicz, Zybała, and Kaczmarz to my family tree. Needless to say, I was pleased to make a donation to contribute to the volunteer site.

When I learned that Julie Roberts Szczepankiewicz was to give a presentation on Polish Genealogy Research to the Polish Genealogical Society of New York State at their April 2016 meeting in Buffalo, I encouraged PGSNYS members to attend. I also reached out to several of my DNA matches in western New York and nearby Canada.

Although one of my DNA matches from southern Ontario was unable to attend the presentation, we exchanged information. She had been adopted, but she knew the names of her birth parents. coin that Grandma Drach sewed to her hemHer birth father had even given her a tangible piece of her heritage, one of the coins that had been sewn into the interior hem of her ancestor’s dress when she left the country telling her that it was ‘not allowed’ to take monies out and that they ‘escaped’. 

My DNA match had found the ship manifests from her father’s parents’ arrivals in Canada, but she was not sure from where they had come. But I did! I had been down this road and I knew some of the signposts. And we’re family!

loniow
Suchowola, Osiek, and Świniary, Łoniów, near Gnieszowice, Koprzywnica; Google map

Her grandfather Józef Drach‘s ship record said he was born in Świniary, Sandomierz. There are 2 very small villages named Stare Świniary and Nowe Świniary approximately 3 kilometers south of Łoniów. In Polish, Stare means old, Nowe means new. Both villages are in the administrative district of Gmina Łoniów, within Sandomierz County, Świętokrzyskie, about seven kilometers from Gnieszowice, where my grandmother Agnieszka was born.

Drach
Józef Drach, ship Lituania from Danzig to Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, 1930

Józef‘s parents were identified as Jan and Katarzyna Drach. Jan is the Polish version of the English name John. Katarzyna is the Polish name for Katherine.

Geneteka had an indexed record that indicated that Jan Drach and Katarzyna Borycka married in  Łoniów in 1895 (entry #23), as well as listing the baptism of Józef Drach in Łoniów in 1905 (entry #27). The church in Łoniów is Kościół św. Mikołaja, St. Nicholas. While the record indices have been posted online, I did not find the original records.

My DNA match’s grandmother was Aniela Wieczorek. Her ship record said she was born in Suchowola, and her sister Katarzyna lived in Suchowola, Sandomierz. Today, Suchowola is a village in the administrative district of Gmina Osiek, within Staszów County, Świętokrzyskie Voivodeship. It is not far from Sandomierz.

The nearest church is Kościół św. Stanisława Biskupa i Męczennika, St. Stanislaus Bishop and Martyr, in Osiek. Since ship and Canadian records said that Aniela Wieczorek was born in 1900 or 1901, the most likely record is in 1900, entry 143.

1900 Aniela Wieczorek birth
Aniela Wieczorek birth record, 1900, Osiek, Urząd Stanu Cywilnego, Św. Stanisława

Aniela‘s nearest relative was listed as her sister Katarzyna Janoś (sp?).

aniela
Aniela Wieczorek, ship Melita from Warsaw, Poland, to Saint John, New Brunswick, Canada, 1924

 Katarzyna Wieczorek was a popular name, with baptisms of girls with that name occurring regularly in Osiek.

  • 1891  35
  • 1893  134
  • 1895  71
  • 1896  78
  • 1897  100
  • 1901  83

Although these records were available online, they were written in the Napoleonic format in Cyrillic, because this area was occupied by Russia in the 19th and early 20th century. I was not able to read the records myself, but my DNA match was able to use this information to extend her family tree to Michał Wieczorek and Franciszka Czech and beyond.

GEDmatch estimated the number of generations to our most recent common ancestor (MRCA) is 4.8, since we share a 19.1 centiMorgan DNA segment on chromosome 3. While we have not found our common ancestors, we found the common location where our ancestors lived.

loniow2
Zamek Krzyżtopór, Baranów Sandomierski, and Sandomierz, Świętokrzyskie, Poland, Google map

When traveling in Poland, I stayed at the hotel at Baranów Sandomierski Castle, across the Wisła (Vistula) River from our grandparents’ birth places. I also visited the towns of Sandomierz and Opatów, and Krzyżtopór Castle in Ujazd,  Iwaniska, Opatów, about 22 kilometers from Łoniów. I had read about these places in James Michener’s novel, Poland, and I was glad to make the connection to our family history in what is now Świętokrzyskie province.

Sources

Wikipedia contributors, “Gnieszowice,” Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Gnieszowice&oldid=771022160 (accessed December 18, 2018).

“Ancestry,” database, Ancestry (ancestry.com: accessed 12 December 2018), Jozef Drach; citing Passenger Lists. Jozef Drach, Male, 25, abt 1905, Poland, Departure Port: Danzig, Poland, Arrival date: 8 Apr 1930, Arrival Port: Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, Vessel: Lituania; Library and Archives Canada; Ottawa, Ontario, Canada; Series: RG 76-C; Roll: T-14825; Ancestry.com. Canadian Passenger Lists, 1865-1935 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2010. Library and Archives Canada, n.d. RG 76-C. Department of Employment and Immigration fonds. Library and Archives Canada Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.

Polskie Towarzystwo Genealogiczne, “Geneteka, Metryki,” database, Polish Genealogical Society, Genealodzy (genealodzy.pl: accessed 2016), Józef Drach; citing church records or Urząd Stanu Cywilnego (Civil Registry Office). 1905 27 Józef Drach Łoniów Łoniów [Indeks dodał: Wojciech_Liśkiewicz] .

Genealogiczne, Genealodzy, Jan Drach, Katarzyna Borycka. 1895 23 Jan Drach Katarzyna Borycka Łoniów [ Miejscowość: Łoniów] [Indeks dodał: Wojciech_Liśkiewicz] .

“Ancestry,” database, Ancestry, Aniela Wieczorek, Female, abt 1900, Birth Place: Suchowola, Age: 24, Date of Arrival: 12 Apr 1924, Port of Arrival: Saint John, New Brunswick, Port of Departure: Warsaw, Poland, Ship Name: Melita, Library and Archives Canada; Form 30A Ocean Arrivals (Individual Manifests), 1919-1924; Rolls: T-14939 – T-15248; Ancestry.com. Canada, Ocean Arrivals (Form 30A), 1919-1924 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2009. Library and Archives Canada. Form 30A, 1919-1924 (Ocean Arrivals). Ottawa, Ontario, Canada: Library and Archives Canada, n.d.. RG 76. Department of Employment and Immigration .

Towarzystwa Genealogicznego Centralnej Polski, Birth, Aniela Wieczorek; digital images, Towarzystwa Genealogicznego Centralnej Polski (http://metryki.genealodzy.pl : accessed December 2018). 1900 143 Aniela Wieczorek Osiek Osiek [Indeks dodał: Jabłoński_Edward]

Towarzystwa Genealogicznego Centralnej Polski, Marriage, Jan Czosnek, Franciszka Cech; digital images, Towarzystwa Genealogicznego Centralnej Polski (http://metryki.genealodzy.pl : accessed December 2018). 1880 3 Jan Czosnek Franciszka Cech Osiek [ Miejscowość: Osiek] [Indeks dodał: Jabłoński_Edward]

Towarzystwa Genealogicznego Centralnej Polski, Marriage, 1890 4, Michał Wieczorek Franciszka Czosnek; digital images, Towarzystwa Genealogicznego Centralnej Polski (http://metryki.genealodzy.pl : accessed December 2018). 1890 4 Michał Wieczorek, Franciszka Czosnek Osiek [ Miejscowość: Osiek] [Indeks dodał: Jabłoński_Edward]

Michener, James A. Poland. Random House, 1983

Klein Family Came from West Prussia

In Polish Surnames: Origins and Meanings, author William “Fred” Hoffman lists the variations of the Polish Klajn surname. It comes from the German word klein meaning small or young, and the German form Klein is found most often in Poland.

Klein name

Klajn entry from Polish Surnames: Origins and Meanings, 2001

In the late 1800s, Michał, Józef, Jan, Roman, and Benedykt Klein lived in Buffalo, Erie, New York. Church and other records indicated that they were related. They were witnesses at each other’s weddings. They were godparents at Klein children’s christenings. They even named their children after one another. They had come from Prussia, the part of Poland that was occupied by Germany at that time. They were likely to have spoken both Polish and some German. From about 1878 to 1888, they had each immigrated to Buffalo, New York, from Kościelna Jania, which was called Kirchenjahn, in the Prussian province of Marienwerder, West Prussia. [1]

Today, the village of Kościelna Jania is not very large, with only 220 people. Wikipedia saysKoscielna Jania

Kościelna Jania (German: Kirchenjahn) is a village in the administrative district of Gmina Smętowo Graniczne, within Starogard County, Pomeranian Voivodeship, in northern Poland. It lies approximately 6 kilometres (4 mi) west of Smętowo Graniczne, 25 km (16 mi) south of Starogard Gdański, and 69 km (43 mi) south of the regional capital Gdańsk.

Michał and Jan‘s marriage records at the Polish St. Stanislaus Church in Buffalo, Erie, New York, listed their parents as Jan Klein and Barbara Kotowska. The Klein babies’ baptismal records at St. Stanislaus Church said that their fathers had been born in Kościelna Jania, in Borussia, the Latin name for Prussia. The old records are available on FamilySearch for the Roman Catholic parish register of baptisms, marriages and deaths for Kirchenjahn (Kr. Marienwerder), West Prussia, Germany; now Kościelna Jania (Starogard Gdańsk), Gdańsk, Poland. Text in Latin, Polish and German.

1200px-SM_Kościelna_Jania_Kościół_Świętej_Trójcy_(1)_ID_637746

Kościół Świętej Trójcy w Koscielnej Jani

Kościół is the Polish word for church, while Kirche is the German word. It is not surprising that the Jania/Jahn village with the Roman Catholic church was called Kościelna Jania in Polish and Kirchenjahn in German.

I was able to find the marriage of Jan Klein and Barbara Kotowska at Kościół Trójcy Świętej w Kościelnej Jani, Church of the Holy Trinity in Kościelna Jania, on 4 Nov 1845.

1845 Klein Kotowska marriage marked

1845 Marriage, Johan Klein and Barbara Kotowska, Kirchen Jahn, West Prussia (Kościelna Jania, Poland)

Jan Klein was born about 1819. Barbara Kotowska was born to Antoni Kotowski and Julianna G. in Kościelna Jania in 27 May 1827. She was baptized 29 May 1827.

1827 Barbara Kotowska birth marked

1827 Baptism Record, Barbara Kotowska, Kirchen Jahn, West Prussia (Kościelna Jania, Poland)

 Johann Klein and Barbara Kotowska‘s son Michael Klein was born in Kirchen Jahn on 12 Sep 1846 and baptized at Kościół Trójcy Świętej w Kościelnej Jani on 14 Sep 1846.

1846 Michael Klein birth marked

1846 Baptism Record, Michael Klein, Kirchen Jahn, West Prussia (Kościelna Jania, Poland)

Joseph Klein was born to Johann Klein and Barbara Kotowska in Kirchen Jahn on 2 Dec 1848 and baptized 5 Dec 1848.

1848 Joseph Klein Birth marked

1848 Baptism Record, Joseph Klein, Kirchen Jahn, West Prussia (Kościelna Jania, Poland)

Johann Klein was born to Johann Klein and Barbara Kotowska in Kirchen Jahn on 9 Sep 1851 and baptized 10 Sep 1851.

1851 Johann Klein marked

1851 Baptism Record, Johann Klein, Kirchen Jahn, West Prussia (Kościelna Jania, Poland)

Roman Klein was born to Johann Klein and Barbara Kotowska in Kirchen Jahn on 2 Aug 1857 and baptized 10 Aug 1857.

1857 Roman Klein marked

1857 Baptism Record, Roman Klein, Kirchen Jahn, West Prussia (Kościelna Jania, Poland)

Benedykt Klein was born to Johann Klein and Barbara Kotowska in Kirchen Jahn on 5 Jul 1861 and baptized 5 Jul 1861.

1861 Benedict Klein marked

1861 Baptism Record, Benedict Klein, Kirchen Jahn, West Prussia (Kościelna Jania, Poland)

In each of these baptism records, Johann Klein was identified as “Schneider,” the German word for “tailor.” It literally means “someone who cuts,” from the German verb schneiden “to cut”. He was identified as Catholisch, not Evangelisch, indicating that he was Roman Catholic. In general, the Polish people in this region were Roman Catholic, and the Germans were Protestant, but there were exceptions. A few people with Polish names were German, while others with German names were Polish.

While Michał and Jan Klein were each married at St. Stanislaus RC Church in Buffalo in 1874 and 1884, Józef Klein (of Kirchenjahn) married Elizabeth Ośmiła in early 1877 in Barloschno, Marienwerder, West Prussia, about 2 miles from Kościelna Jania. It is now Barłożno, Skórcz, Starogard, Pomorskie, in Poland. The Roman Catholic Church in Barłożno is Kościół św. Marcina, St. Martin. The records were found  at Family Search as Roman Catholic parish register and transcripts of births, marriages and deaths for Barloschno, Westpreußen, Germany; now Barłożno (Starogard Gdański), Gdańsk, Poland. Text in Latin, Polish and German.

1877 Klein Osmila marriage marked

1877 Marriage, Józef Klein and Elizabeth Ośmiła, Barloschno, West Prussia (Barłożno, Poland)

Unfortunately, Elisabeth Ośmiła Klein must have died, because widower Józef Klein (age 38) married again in 16 Feb 1885 to Maryanna Chrzanowska (age 23) at Kościół Trójcy Świętej in Kirchen Jahn. This family immigrated to the United States in 1888.

1885 Klein Chrzanowska marriage marked

1885 Marriage, Józef Klein and Maryanna Chrzanowska, Kirchen Jahn, West Prussia (Kościelna Jania, Poland)

In Buffalo, Józef‘ and Marya became the parents of Feliks Maryan Klein. In Feliks‘ 1890 baptism record from St. Stanislaus  Church in Buffalo, New York, Józef‘s place of birth was identified as Kościelna Jania and Marya‘s was listed as Leśna Jania.

Leśna is the Polish word for Forestry. The village of Leśna Jania is approximately 3 kilometers (<2 miles) south of Kościelna Jania.

Maryanna Chrzanowska was born to Peter Chrzanowski and Antonia Laskowska in Lesnijahn in 24 Oct 1862. She was baptized at Kościół Trójcy Świętej w Kościelnej Jani, Church of the Holy Trinity in Kościelna Jania on 28 Oct 1862.

1862 Marianna Chrzanowska birth marked

1862 Baptism Record, Maryanna Chrzanowska, Kirchen Jahn, West Prussia (Kościelna Jania, Poland)

Piotr/Peter Chrzanowski and Antonia Laskowska were married in Barłożno on 15 Nov 1858. Piotr Chrzanowski had been baptized in Kościelna Jania in 1832. Antonia Laskowska, the daughter of Jakub Laskowski and Wiktoria Guz, was baptized in Barłożno in 1840.

1858 Chrzanowski Laskowska marriage marked

1858 Marriage, Peter Chrzanowski and Antonia Laskowska, Barloschno, West Prussia (Barłożno, Poland)

The villages of Kościelna Jania and Leśna Jania are about 20 miles away from the village of Szembruczek, where Martin and Anna Szczepański had lived in West Prussia before coming to the United States. In 1913, Felix Klein married Marta Szczepańska, Martin and Anna‘s daughter, in Bennington, Wyoming, New York. These were their ancestors.

Feliks & Marta chart

Ancestors of Feliks Klein and Marta Szczepanska

[1] There may have been other Klein children, even other children who immigrated to Buffalo or elsewhere. I started looking for Feliks Klein’s ancestors, and could not help but find other Klein relatives in Buffalo, New York.

Sources

Hoffman, William F. Polish Surnames: Origins and Meanings. Chicago, Illinois : Polish Genealogical Society of America. 1993, Second Edition, Revised 2001.

“Kościelna Jania.” Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, 13 Jul. 2017. Web. 10 Oct. 2018.

By Sławomir Milejski – Praca własna, CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=48604836

Parafia pod wezwaniem Trójcy Świętej w Kościelnej Jani, Holy Trinity, Kościelna Jania, http://www.koscielnajaniaparafia.pl/

“Leśna Jania.” Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, 13 Jul. 2017. Web. 10 Oct. 2018.

“Barłożno.” Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, 13 Jul. 2017. Web. 11 Nov. 2018.

Polskie Towarzystwo Genealogiczne, “Geneteka, Metryki,” database, Polish Genealogical Society, Genealodzy (genealodzy.pl: accessed November 2018); citing church records or Urząd Stanu Cywilnego (Civil Registry Office).

LDS Family History Library, “Kościelna Jania (Starogard),” database, Kościół rzymsko-katolicki. Parafja, Family Search (familysearch.com: accessed November 2018), Jan Klein and Barbara Kotowska, marriage 1845/16; citing Germany, Preußen, Westpreußen, Kirchenjahn – Church records; https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSVW-H9FK-7?i=328&cat=369158

LDS Family History Library, “Barłożno (Starogard),” database, Kościół rzymsko-katolicki. Parafja, Family Search (familysearch.com: accessed November 2018), Piotr Chrzanowski and Antonia Laskowska, marriage 1858/16; citing Germany, Preußen, Westpreußen, Barloschno – Church records; https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CS2Y-8SXB-T?i=500&cat=244497

LDS Family History Library, “Barłożno (Starogard),” database, Kościół rzymsko-katolicki. Parafja, Family Search (familysearch.com: accessed November 2018), Josef Klein and Elizabeth Ośmiła, marriage 1877/2; citing Germany, Preußen, Westpreußen, Barloschno – Church records; https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CS2Y-8S6R-1?i=27&cat=244497

LDS Family History Library, “Kościelna Jania (Starogard),” database, Kościół rzymsko-katolicki. Parafja, Family Search (familysearch.com: accessed November 2018), Joseph Klein and               Marianna Chrzanowska, marriage 1858/16; citing Germany, Preußen, Westpreußen, Kirchenjahn – Church records;  https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSVW-H9FK-D?i=390&cat=369158

LDS Family History Library, “Kościelna Jania (Starogard),” database, Kościół rzymsko-katolicki. Parafja, Family Search (familysearch.com: accessed November 2018), Barbara Kotowska, birth 1827; citing Germany, Preußen, Westpreußen, Kirchenjahn – Church records; https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSZY-4W6H?i=282&cat=369158

LDS Family History Library, “Kościelna Jania (Starogard),” database, Kościół rzymsko-katolicki. Parafja, Family Search (familysearch.com: accessed November 2018), Piotr Chrzanowski, birth 1832; citing Germany, Preußen, Westpreußen, Kirchenjahn – Church records; https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSZY-4WZQ?i=291&cat=369158

Polskie Towarzystwo Genealogiczne, “Geneteka, Metryki,” database, Polish Genealogical Society, Genealodzy (genealodzy.pl: accessed November 2018), Antonia Laskowska, 1840; citing church records or Urząd Stanu Cywilnego (Civil Registry Office).

LDS Family History Library, “Kościelna Jania (Starogard),” database, Kościół rzymsko-katolicki. Parafja, Family Search (familysearch.com: accessed November 2018), Michał Klein, birth 1846/43; citing Germany, Preußen, Westpreußen, Kirchenjahn – Church records; https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSVW-H9NS-K?i=183&cat=369158

LDS Family History Library, “Kościelna Jania (Starogard),” database, Kościół rzymsko-katolicki. Parafja, Family Search (familysearch.com: accessed November 2018), Józef Klein, birth 1848/51; citing Germany, Preußen, Westpreußen, Kirchenjahn – Church records; https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSVW-H9N9-7?i=194&cat=369158

LDS Family History Library, “Kościelna Jania (Starogard),” database, Kościół rzymsko-katolicki. Parafja, Family Search (familysearch.com: accessed November 2018), Jan Klein, birth 1851/58; citing Germany, Preußen, Westpreußen, Kirchenjahn – Church records; https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSVW-H9F1-Z?i=209&cat=369158

LDS Family History Library, “Kościelna Jania (Starogard),” database, Kościół rzymsko-katolicki. Parafja, Family Search (familysearch.com: accessed November 2018), Roman Klein, birth 1857/46; citing Germany, Preußen, Westpreußen, Kirchenjahn – Church records;  https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSVW-H9NM-W?i=237&cat=369158

LDS Family History Library, “Kościelna Jania (Starogard),” database, Kościół rzymsko-katolicki. Parafja, Family Search (familysearch.com: accessed November 2018), Benedykt Klein, birth 1861/50; citing Germany, Preußen, Westpreußen, Kirchenjahn – Church records;  https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSVW-H9FB-R?i=259&cat=369158

LDS Family History Library, “Kościelna Jania (Starogard),” database, Kościół rzymsko-katolicki. Parafja, Family Search (familysearch.com: accessed November 2018), Marianna Chrzanowska, birth 1862/64; citing Germany, Preußen, Westpreußen, Kirchenjahn – Church records;  https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSVW-H9FR-T?i=267&cat=369158

LDS Family History Library, “Kościelna Jania (Starogard),” database, Kościół rzymsko-katolicki. Parafja, Family Search (familysearch.com: accessed November 2018), Bronisława Klein, birth 1878/4; citing Germany, Preußen, Westpreußen, Kirchenjahn – Church records;  https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSVW-H9FH-C?i=58&cat=369158

LDS Family History Library, “Kościelna Jania (Starogard),” database, Kościół rzymsko-katolicki. Parafja, Family Search (familysearch.com: accessed November 2018), Benedykt Klein, birth 1879/30; citing Germany, Preußen, Westpreußen, Kirchenjahn – Church records;  https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSVW-H9F4-4?i=65&cat=369158

LDS Family History Library, “Kościelna Jania (Starogard),” database, Kościół rzymsko-katolicki. Parafja, Family Search (familysearch.com: accessed November 2018), Teodosia Klein, birth 1880/52; citing Germany, Preußen, Westpreußen, Kirchenjahn – Church records;  https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSVW-H9F9-R?i=74&cat=369158

Klein Family in Western New York

On 27 Oct 1913, Marta Szczepańska, the daughter of Martin Szczepański and Anna Kalinowska, married Feliks Klein, son of Joseph Klein and Marianna Chrzanowska, at Sacred Heart of Jesus Roman Catholic Church in Bennington, Wyoming, New York.

Both sets of parents had immigrated to the United States from West Prussia. The bride and groom were each born in Buffalo and baptized at Saint Stanislaus Bishop & Martyr Roman Catholic Church in Buffalo, Erie, New York.

Martin and Anna Szczepański had come from Szembruczek, Grudziądz, in 1881. In German, it was Klein Schönbruck (Kr. Graudenz), Westpreußen. Now, Szembruczek is in the Kuyavian-Pomeranian Voivodeship, or in Polish, województwo kujawsko-pomorskie. Marta was born in Buffalo and baptized on 15 April 1895.

Josef and Marianne Klein and three children Brunisław, Bronisława, and Martha arrived in New York, New York on the ship Eider from Bremen and Southampton on 18 Apr 1888.

1888 Klein CastleGarden

1888 Klein Family, Castle Garden Search Result

1888 Klein ship manifest marked

1888 ship manifest, ship Eider from Bremen and Southampton to New York

Feliks Maryan Klein was born in Buffalo 21 Nov 1890 and baptized at St. Stanislaus  Church in Buffalo, New York. Józef Klein‘s place of birth was identified as Kościelna Jania and Marya Chrzanowska‘s was listed as Leśna Jania. They were mistakenly identified as places in the Prussian province of Posen.

1890 Feliks Klein 1

1890 Feliks Klein 2

1890 Feliks Maryan Klein Baptism, St. Stanislaus RC Church, Buffalo, New York

Feliks‘ godparents were Benedykt Klein and Konstancya Klein. Benedykt was a tailor who had immigrated to the United States in 1880. Konstancya was the wife of Roman Klein, a shoemaker who had arrived in 1880.

Joseph and Maria Klein appeared in Buffalo, New York, in the 1892 New York State census with their children. Bronisławka, Anna, and Felix. Their daughter Martha was not listed with them.

1892 Klein census

1892 New York state census, Felix and Martha Klein, Buffalo, Erie, New York

On 23 Apr 1893, Helena Marta Klein was baptized at St. Stanislaus RC Church, Buffalo, New York.

1893 Klein Helena 1

1893 Klein Helena 2

1893 Helena Marta Klein Baptism, St. Stanislaus RC Church, Buffalo, New York

Helena Marta‘s godfather was listed as Michał Klein. In the first page of the marriage register of the newly founded St. Stanislaus Church in Buffalo, Michael Klein, son of Joannes Klein and Barbara Kotowska, married Marcjanna Ciężska, daughter of Adalbert and Agnes. Joannes is the Latin form for the Polish name Jan. Adalbert is the Latin form for the Polish name Wojciech.

1874 Klein Ciężska marriage

1874 marriage register, St. Stanislaus RC Church, Buffalo, New York

In 1884, Jan Klein, son of Jan Klein and Barbara Kotowska, married Katarzyna Ƶyngier, daughter of Józef Ƶyngier and Katarzyna Mazurowska at St. Stanislaus RC Church, Buffalo, New York. Katarzyna was the godmother of Helena Klein in 1893.

1884 Klein Zyngier marriage

1884 marriage register, St. Stanislaus RC Church, Buffalo, New York

I found a page in the St. Stanislaus baptism registers with twins Marta Aniela and Roman Benedykt born Sept. 16, 1887, to Michał Klein of Kościelna Jania and Martyna Cięzka. Martyna is Latin for the Polish name Marcianna/Marcjanna.

Michał, Jan, Roman, and Benedykt were Józef Klein‘s brothers.

Although the Szczepański  family had already moved to Bennington, Wyoming, New York, for the 1900 census, the Joseph and Mary Klein family was at 74 Reed Street in Buffalo. The correction in the record suggests that Mary was Joseph‘s second wife, married in 1885. Felix’s half-sister Bronisława/Anna was listed as Agnes in the 1900 census, and she may have been Anna Klein who married Bolesław Kapanek about 1904. John Klein, age 48, was listed as a boarder with Joseph and Mary in 1900.

1900 Klein cropped

1900 census, Joseph and Mary Klein, Buffalo, Erie, New York

By 1910, the Joseph Klein family had moved to Bennington, New York. In the census, Felix Klein was listed as a farm hand with his sister Helen and her husband Arthur Fox on Harlow Road in Darien, New York.

1910 Klein census cropped

1910 census, Joseph and Mary Klein, Bennington, Wyoming, New York

Joseph Klein died 26 Nov 1912. He was buried in Sacred Heart Cemetery in Bennington, Wyoming, New York. With her younger sons, Mary Chrzanowska Klein moved to 47 Rich Street in Buffalo, New York, before her death in the 1930s.

After their 1913 marriage, Felix and Martha Klein lived on Town Line Road in Bennington, Wyoming, New York for the 1915 census.

1915 Kline cropped

1915 New York state census, Felix and Martha Klein, Bennington, Wyoming, New York

But when Felix registered for the World War I draft in 1917, the couple lived at 219 Loepere Street in Buffalo, New York, with their two children. The family was at the same address for the census in 1920.

1917 Felix Klein 005262574_02252

World War I draft registration, Felix Klein, Buffalo, New York

By the 1925 New York census, Felix F. and Martha Klein had moved to Allegany Road in Bennington Center, New York. Felix also used the middle name Florian, because it was the name listed in 1942 when he signed up for the World War II draft.

1942 Felix Klein 44544_03_00013-01591

WWII Draft Registration, Felix Florian Klein, Bennington, NY

Felix and Martha farmed for many years in Bennington before they retired to 1910 Sharrick Road, in Darien, Genesee, New York. They both died in 1964, and were laid to rest in Sacred Heart Cemetery in Bennington, Wyoming, New York.

The children of Feliks Klein and Marta Szczepańska were:

  • Franciszka KLEIN (1914-1993)
  • Teresa KLEIN (1916-2005)
  • Leo Albert KLEIN (1920-1977)
  • Clara KLEIN (1923-2011)
  • Richard Joseph KLEIN (1925-1985)
  • Norman J. KLEIN (1930-1985)
  • Barbara Ann KLEIN (1936-2016)

Klein family

Felix and Martha Klein and Family (1963)

Sources

“Passenger Lists,” database, The Battery Conservancy, Castle Garden (castlegarden.org: accessed ‎27 October 2018), Klein; citing ship manifests

Ancestry.com. New York, Passenger and Crew Lists (including Castle Garden and Ellis Island), 1820-1957 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010. Year: 1888; Arrival: New York, New York; Microfilm Serial: M237, 1820-1897; Microfilm Roll: Roll 517; Line: 37; List Number: 472

St. Stanislaus Bishop & Martyr RC Church (Buffalo, New York), Baptism 1890, page 26, Feliks Maryan Klein; FHL microfilm, entry 932

1892 New York State Census, New York State; Buffalo, Erie, population schedule, Ward 14, Joseph Klein, Family Search, FHL Microfilm.

St. Stanislaus Bishop & Martyr RC Church (Buffalo, New York), Baptism 1893, page 344, Helena Marta Klein; FHL microfilm, entry 387

St. Stanislaus Bishop & Martyr RC Church (Buffalo, New York), Marriage 1874, page 2, Michael Klein, Marcjanna Ciężska; FHL microfilm, entry 6

St. Stanislaus Bishop & Martyr RC Church (Buffalo, New York), Marriage 1884, Jan Klein, Katarzyna Ƶyngier; FHL microfilm, entry 53

1900 U. S. Census, New York, population schedule, Buffalo Ward 14, Erie, New York, Felix Klein; digital images, HeritageQuest Online (heritagequestonline.com : accessed 5 October 2018).

1910 Federal Census, New York State, population schedule, Darien, Genesee, New York, Joseph Klein; digital images, Heritage Quest Online (www.heritagequestonline.com : accessed 10 October 2018).

1910 Federal Census, New York State, population schedule, Bennington, Wyoming, New York, Joseph Klein; digital images, Heritage Quest Online (www.heritagequestonline.com : accessed 6 October 2018).

Sacred Heart of Jesus RC Cemetery (Bennington, New York), gravestones and record cards.

Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 11 October 2018), memorial page for Joseph Klein (5 Dec 1848–26 Nov 1912), Find A Grave Memorial no. 60436404, citing Sacred Heart Cemetery, Bennington, Wyoming County, New York, USA ; Maintained by Jim and Elizabeth (contributor 47230507) .

1920 Federal Census, New York, population schedule, Buffalo Ward 15, Erie, New York, , Mary Klein.

1915 New York State Census, New York State, population schedule, Bennington, Wyoming, , Felix Kline.

“World War I Draft Registration Cards,” database, Ancestry.com (: accessed 5 October 2018), Felix Klein; citing World War I Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918.

1920 Federal Census, New York, population schedule, Buffalo Ward 15, Erie, New York, Feliks Klein; digital images, HeritageQuest (heritagequestonline.com : accessed 11 October 2018).

National Archives, “World War II Draft Registration Cards,” database, Ancestry.com (: accessed 5 October 2018), Felix Florian Klein; citing World War II Draft Cards (Fourth Registration).

New York State, Death Index Beginning 1957, Martha Klein, 5 June 1964; digital images,  (https://health.data.ny.gov/Health/Genealogical-Research-Death-Index-Beginning-1957 : accessed November 2017).

KLEIN-Martha, Buffalo Courier Express, Buffalo, New York, 10 June 1964, page 10.

KLEIN-Felix, Buffalo Courier Express, Buffalo, New York, 26 July 1964, page 8B.

Personal letters to author from Clara Klein Rembas, 1990s.

Kajdasz Family Came from Posen

After Andrzej and Jadwiga Kajdasz arrived in Buffalo in 1888, the family grew. In 1900, the census showed the family was living at 51 Sobieski Street in Buffalo, Erie, New York. Marcin/Martin had married and was living nearby with his wife Rozalia. The older children were listed with English names, and Marya was listed with the name Julia. In later years, her name was usually listed as Mary J., so Julia is likely her middle name. Another boy, Franciszek, was born 1 August 1900.

1900 Kaidas census cropped

1900 census, Andrew and Jadwiga Kajasz and family, Buffalo, Erie, New York

Andrzej and Jadwiga‘s daughter Magdalena had been baptized in 1890 at St. Adalbert Basilica at 212 Stanislaus Street in Buffalo, Erie, New York. Her parents were listed as Andrea Kajdasz and Hedwig Wojcieczak. Later, Andrzej and Jadwiga joined the Polish National Church. When they died in 1917 and 1934, they were interred in the Holy Mother of the Rosary Polish National Parish Cemetery in Cheektowaga, Erie, New York.

1890 Magdalina Kajdasz birth cropped

1890 Magdalena Kadisz, baptism, St.Adalbert Basilica, Buffalo, New York

Magdalena‘s baptism record said that Andrzej and Jadwiga were from Poznań. A search at the Poznań Project found their 1876 marriage in both church and civil records. These matched their immigration records, which reported that they had come from Schroda.

Kajdasz Poznan Project

Andrzej Kajdasz and Jadwiga Wojcieszek, 1876 Poznan Project results

Mądre - Wikipedia

Mądre, Środa Wielkopolska

Wikipedia says that “Mądre is a village in the administrative district of Gmina Zaniemyśl, within Środa Wielkopolska County, Greater Poland Voivodeship, in west-central Poland. It lies approximately 7 kilometres (4 mi) east of Zaniemyśl, 8 km (5 mi) south of Środa Wielkopolska, and 36 km (22 mi) south-east of the regional capital Poznań.” The church in Mądre is Kościół Rzymskokatolicki Pw. św. Jadwigi Śląskiej, St. Hedwig of Silesia. Mądre is the Polish word for “wise.”

A search for Andrzej‘s parents, Jakub Kajdasz and Marianna Walkowiak, shows that they were married in 1844 in Środa Wielkopolska, and his father’s name was Tomasz.

Kajdasz Jakub Poznan Project

Jakub Kajdasz and Marianna Walkowiak, Poznan Project results, 1844

Collegiate church and marketplace

Środa Wielkopolska Collegiate church and marketplace

Jakub and Marianna‘s marriage was indexed in Geneteka, which said they were married 10 November 1844. The old church in Środa is Parafia Kolegiacka Wniebowzięcia Najświętszej Marii Panny, Collegiate parish church Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary. The word Środa means “Wednesday” in Polish.

Jadwiga‘s parents were also found at the Poznań Project. Marcin Wojcieszek and Dorota Wawrzynkiewicz were married in Koźmin in 1849.

Wojcieszak Poznan Project

Marcin Woycieszak and Dorota Wawrzynkiewicz, Poznan Project results, 1849

Wikipedia says “Koźmin Wielkopolski (German: Koschmin) is a town in Krotoszyn County, Greater Poland Voivodeship, Poland, with 6,678 inhabitants according to the 2010 census.” The Roman Catholic church in Koźmin is Kościół pw. św. Wawrzyńca, St. Lawrence. Described as dating from 999, it has undergone many changes through the centuries.

While I have not yet located the original records, this indexed information fills in some names in the ancestry tree of Marya‘s son Daniel with Konstanty Maciejewski Konstanty was also known as August Warner.

DanielSources

1900 Federal Census, New York, population schedule, Election District 5 Buffalo city Ward 14, Erie, New York, United States, enumeration district (ED) District: 112, Jadwiga Kaidas; digital images, HeritageQuest (heritagequestonline.com : accessed May 2017).

St. Adalbert RC Church, Buffalo, New York, Church records, FHL microfilm, Family History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah, birth 1890, Magdalena Kadasz.

St. Adalbert’s Basilica Complex, Buffalo, NY, Polonia Trail, Western New York, Polish-American Congress WNY, http://poloniatrail.com/location/st-adalberts-basilica-complex/

Holy Mother of the Rosary Cathedral Polish National Catholic Church Complex, Polish-American Congress WNY, http://poloniatrail.com/location/holy-mother-of-the-rosary-cathedral-polish-national-catholic-church/

Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 13 October 2018), memorial page for Andrzej Kajdasz (30 Nov 1859–23 Aug 1917), Find A Grave Memorial no. 115361906, citing Holy Mother of the Rosary Parish Cemetery, Cheektowaga, Erie County, New York, USA ; Maintained by Dakota (contributor 48202698)

Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 13 October 2018), memorial page for Jadwiga Kajdasz (1856–1934), Find A Grave Memorial no. 115361905, citing Holy Mother of the Rosary Parish Cemetery, Cheektowaga, Erie County, New York, USA ; Maintained by Dakota (contributor 48202698) .

Łukasz Bielecki, “Poznan Project,” database, Poznan Project (http://poznan-project.psnc.pl: accessed 11 October 2018), Andreas Kajdasz , Hedwig Wojcieszak; citing church records or Urząd Stanu Cywilnego (Civil Registry Office).

“Mądre.” Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, 7 Oct. 2017. Web. 12 Oct. 2018.

Kościół Rzymskokatolicki Pw. św. Jadwigi Śląskiej, St. Hedwig of Silesia. Mądre, Środa Wielkopolska. http://parafiamadre.pl/

Łukasz Bielecki, “Poznan Project,” database, Poznan Project (http://poznan-project.psnc.pl: accessed 12 October 2018), Jakub Kajdasz and Marianna Walkowiak; citing church records or Urząd Stanu Cywilnego (Civil Registry Office).

“Środa Wielkopolska.” Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, 16 Jun. 2018. Web. 13 Oct. 2018.

Polskie Towarzystwo Genealogiczne, “Geneteka, Metryki,” database, Polish Genealogical Society, Genealodzy (genealodzy.pl: accessed 12 October 2018), Marriage of Jakub Kajdasz and Marianna Walkowiak; citing church records or Urząd Stanu Cywilnego (Civil Registry Office).

Parafia Kolegiacka Wniebowzięcia Najświętszej Marii Panny, Collegiate parish church Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary. Środa Wielkopolska. http://kolegiata.sroda.wlkp.pl/historia.php

Łukasz Bielecki, “Poznan Project,” database, Poznan Project (http://poznan-project.psnc.pl: accessed 12 October 2018), Martinus Woycieszak, Dorothea Wawrzynkiewicz; citing church records or Urząd Stanu Cywilnego (Civil Registry Office).

“Koźmin Wielkopolski.” Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, 10 Jan. 2018. Web. 12 Oct. 2018.

Kościół pw. św. Wawrzyńca, St. Lawrence. Koźmin Wielkopolski. http://www.fara-kozmin.kalisz.opoka.org.pl

Researching Polish/German/Prussian Ancestors from Posen

I was surprised to learn my great-grandfather renounced his allegiance to the Emperor of Germany when he became a citizen of the United States in 1887. I knew he was Polish! This is where the history part of family history becomes important.

The country of Poland did not officially exist when many of our ancestors immigrated to the United States. The Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth had been partitioned by the Kingdom of Prussia, the Russian Empire, and Habsburg Austria in 1772, 1793, and 1795. Ethnically Polish immigrants were listed with German, Russian, or Austrian nationalities in the records, and their places of origin were given with Polish, German, or Russian names. The Latin versions of the place names were listed in Roman Catholic church records. These are research challenges.

Here is a Prussian map from the late 1800s, with the areas that with a few boundary changes, became officially part of Poland after World War I and World War II:

  • 2 East Prussia
  • 13 West Prussia
  • 7 Stettin
  • 8 Posen
  • 12 Silesia

While my father’s ancestors came from West Prussia, allied families identified as German came from East Prussia, Silesia, and Posen.

Posen was the German name of the provincial city as well as the Prussian province. The province of Posen was divided into two government regions (Regierungsbezirke), named Posen (Poznań) and Bromberg (Bydgoszcz). These regions were again subdivided into districts called Kreise, similar to counties.

Kreise of the Prussian Province of Posen in the 19th Century

Of course, these districts had both German and Polish names. The following is a list, with links, from Wikipedia.

Kreis (“County”) Polish spelling Origin
City of Posen
Poznań
Adelnau
Odolanów
Birnbaum
Miedzychód
Bomst
Babimost
Fraustadt
Wschowa
Gostyn
Gostyn Kröben
Grätz
Grodzisk Buk
Jarotschin
Jarocin Pleschen
Kempen
Kępno Schildberg
Koschmin
Koźmin Krotoschin
Kosten
Kościan
Krotoschin
Krotoszyn
Lissa
Leszno Fraustadt
Meseritz
Międzyrzecz
Neutomischel
Nowy Tomyśl Buk
Obornik
Oborniki
Ostrowo
Ostrów ?Adelnau?
Pleschen
Pleszew
Posen Ost
Poznań, Wsch. Posen
Posen West
Poznań, Zach. Posen
Rawitsch
Rawicz Kröben
Samter
Szamotuły
Schildberg
Ostrzeszów
Schmiegel
Śmigiel Kosten
Schrimm
Śrem
Schroda
Środa
Schwerin
Skwierzyna Birnbaum – 1877
Wreschen
Września
City of Bromberg
Bydgoszcz
Bromberg
Bydgoszcz
Czarnikau
Czarników
Filehne
Wieleń Czarnikau
Gnesen
Gniezno
Hohensalza
Inowrocław
Kolmar
Chodzież
Mogilno
Mogilno
Schubin
Szubin
Strelno
Strzelno ??
Wirsitz
Wyrzysk
Witkowo
Witkowo ?Gnesen?
Wongrowitz
Wągrowiec
Znin
Żnin ??

A search for places of the old German Posen province at Kartenmeister.com lists 12,936 entries, including duplicate and alternative spellings for villages, cities, and towns.

This region was historically known as Wielkopolska, or Greater Poland (Großpolen in German). The major city is Poznań. There is considerable overlap with the present-day Greater Poland Voivodeship, województwo wielkopolskie in Polish.

Historical boundaries of Wielkopolska, or Greater Poland, in the boundaries of current Poland

In the twenty first century, Poznań is both a city and a powiat (county) in the Greater Poland Voivodeship. Powiat Poznań  contains the towns Swarzędz, Luboń, Mosina, Murowana Goślina, PuszczykowoKostrzyn, Pobiedziska, Kórnik, Buk, and Stęszew. Each of the towns is associated with about a dozen villages, some which are identified on the map below.

Poznań powiat (county) in present day Poland

Immigrants who said that they came from Posen may have been referring to the city, the nearby villages or towns, or the German province. Although the Poznan Project has been very helpful in indexing marriage records from the German province of Posen/Poznań from 1800 to 1899, it is not complete. Volunteers at Projekt BaSIA are currently indexing many records from this area. Other German and Polish place names can be found on Kartenmeister.com, as well as on old and contemporary maps. While their results are available at no charge, please consider volunteering or donating to these efforts if they can help you in your research.

Sources

File:Prussiamap.gif. (2014, November 25). Wikimedia Commons, the free media repository. Retrieved 17:15, September 27, 2018 from https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?title=File:Prussiamap.gif&oldid=140555672.

Wikipedia contributors. (2018, September 20). Districts of Prussia. In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 17:17, September 27, 2018, from https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Districts_of_Prussia&oldid=860414056

File:Prowincja Poznańska de.svg. (2018, January 9). Wikimedia Commons, the free media repository. Retrieved 17:18, September 27, 2018 from https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?title=File:Prowincja_Pozna%C5%84ska_de.svg&oldid=278217654.

Wikipedia contributors. (2018, September 26). Poznań. In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 17:19, September 27, 2018, from https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Pozna%C5%84&oldid=861254372

File:Poznańskie kaliskie.png. (2018, June 8). Wikimedia Commons, the free media repository. Retrieved 17:20, September 27, 2018 from https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?title=File:Pozna%C5%84skie_kaliskie.png&oldid=305225584.

Wikipedia contributors. (2018, September 21). Poznań County. In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 17:23, September 27, 2018, from https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Pozna%C5%84_County&oldid=860512701

By Poznaniak [CC BY-SA 3.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons