Discovering our Ancestors' Travels and Travails

Archive for the ‘Warner’ Category

Finding my Maciejewski Family’s Ancestral Origins

I was recently contacted by someone researching Maciejewski ancestors who had the same first names as mine did. Although we did not appear to be related (Maciejewski is not a rare Polish name), I was able to commiserate about how difficult it can be to find places in the old country where our families originated, and demonstrate how, over years, I found and confirmed my Maciejewski family who came from West Prussia in 1883.

My great grandfather Jan Maciejewski‘s church death record said he was born in Tylice, and there are four places with that name in Poland. I picked one, and I guessed wrong. I wrote about it, though…  https://myfamilyhistoryresearch.wordpress.com/2015/02/22/maciejewski-from-tylice/

I researched Jan and Weronika Maciejewski‘s children’s baptism records in the United States… https://myfamilyhistoryresearch.wordpress.com/2015/04/10/st-stanislaus-baptism-records/

And saw that the parents were from Nieżywięć and Tylice in West Prussia… https://myfamilyhistoryresearch.wordpress.com/2015/04/11/maciejewski-family-from-tylice-near-niezywiec/

I finally found Jan and Weronika‘s marriage record… https://myfamilyhistoryresearch.wordpress.com/2015/04/21/marriage-of-johann-maciejewski-and-veronica-lewandowska-in-niezywiec-prussia/

But their son, my grandfather Antoni Maciejewski, was not born/baptized in Nieżywięć! I searched civil records from the Torun archives and found my grandfather’s birth record in 1883 in Zgniłobłotyhttps://myfamilyhistoryresearch.wordpress.com/2018/02/13/1883-birth-of-antoni-maciejewski-in-zgnilobloty-west-prussia/

Which helped me recognize the family’s arrival record at Castle Garden in New York City later that year… https://myfamilyhistoryresearch.wordpress.com/2018/02/20/maciejewski-family-arrived-in-new-york-21-december-1883/

And identify other children of this family who were born and died in West Prussia… https://myfamilyhistoryresearch.wordpress.com/2018/07/01/maciejewski-family-resilience

I recommend checking all the records, including siblings, cousins, and other relatives and friends. This is sometimes called “cluster genealogy.” When you seem to be stuck, genealogy author Elizabeth Shown Mills recommends checking the “FAN club”  of your ancestor’s friends, associates, and neighbors. Even for ancestors who were married in America, I have found that couples often knew of each other’s families in the old country.

I wrote about how my grandparents grew up and were married in the US, but their parents’ places of origin were only twenty miles apart half a world away… https://myfamilyhistoryresearch.wordpress.com/2017/12/25/torun-gingerbread/

That’s how chain migration works… https://myfamilyhistoryresearch.wordpress.com/2018/01/24/chain-migration/

Because of the interrelationships of our ancestors, I helped some DNA cousins find their grandparents’ places of origin… https://myfamilyhistoryresearch.wordpress.com/2018/05/06/kalinowska-from-szembruk-west-prussia-looking-for-common-ancestors/  and https://myfamilyhistoryresearch.wordpress.com/2018/05/11/szennato-szynnato-szynwald-gros-schonwalde-deciphering-polish-prussian-place-names/

I often share information about other families I find along the way. Others have helped me. It is always rewarding to help others find primary or contemporaneous sources, and I like to hear from researchers of related families.

Happy ancestor hunting!

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Maciejewski Family Resilience

As I learn more about our ancestors, I am amazed and inspired by their resilience. I knew that my great-grandmother, Weronika Lewandowska Maciejewska, went on to raise their six children–Antoni, Konstanty, Wiktorya, Marya, Anna, and Ludwik–in Buffalo, New York, after the death of her husband Jan Maciejewski in 1896. My father, born in 1928, remembered her before her death in 1943 at age 95. He told me that his grandmother was a very kind woman. I previously chronicled some of the events in her life. But there was much I did not know about her.

Jan and Weronika were married in Nieżywięć, West Prussia, in 1869 and immigrated to the United States with their infant son in 1883. I had wondered what had happened in the fourteen intervening years, and what may have motivated them to emigrate when they did.

I found at least part of the answer in the 1882 church records of Kościół pw. św. Jakuba, Parish Church of Saint James the Apostle in Bobrau (Bobrowo). It was in the Kries (district) of Strasburg (Polish Brodnica), in the Regierungsbezirk (administrative region) Marienwerder of Westpreußen (West Prussia). Today it is Bobrowo, Brodnica, Kujawsko-Pomorskie in Poland.

Deutsch-Eylau_27 Maciejewski

Excerpt, “Deutsch Eylau – 27,” old German Map (Kartenmeister.com)

I found the Maciejewski family in the records of three of the Roman Catholic churches in the area. [1]

  • Kościół Świętego Jana Chrzciciela (St. John the Baptist) in Niezywienc, where they were married  in 1869 and their first son was baptized in 1870,
  • Kościół Świętego Mikołaja Biskupa (St. Nicholas, Bishop) in Groß Kruschin, where they lived for a time, and where another son was baptized in 1872, and
  • Kościół Świętego Jakuba Apostoła Starszego, (Saint James the Apostle the Elder) in Bobrau, the parish church for the small village of Zgniłobłoty, where they lived from 1875 to Antoni Maciejewski’s birth in 1883.

Here are Jan and Weronika‘s children who were born and died in the old country, and whose records I was able to find:

  • Władysław (Ladislaus) (1870-1870)
  • Franciszek (Franz) (1872-1882)
  • Franciszka (Francisca) (1875-1875)
  • Jan (Johann) (1876-1878)
  • Marian (1878-1882)
  • Tomasz (Thomas) Julian (1880-1882)
1870 Ladislaus birth marked

Ladislaus Maciejewski birth/baptism record, Kościół pw. św. Jana Chrzciciela, Nieżywięć (Niezywienc)

  • Their first son, Władysław, was born 8 Oct 1870 in Dombrowken (Dąbrówka) and was baptized at Kościół Świętego Jana Chrzciciela (St. John the Baptist) in Niezywienc (Nieżywięć). Sadly, he died 14 Nov 1870, when he was only a month old. His name was recorded as Ladislaus in the church records.
1872 Franz Maciejewski birth marked

Franz Maciejewski birth/baptism record, Kościół pw. św. Mikołaja Biskupa, Kruszyny (Groß Kruschin)

  • Franciszek (Franz) was born 4 Jul 1872 and baptized at Kościół Świętego Mikołaja Biskupa (St. Nicholas) in Groß Kruschin (Kruszyny). His place of birth was listed as “Forstamt,” which is German for Forestry Office.
1875 Franciszka Maciejewski birth marked

Francisca Maciejewska birth/baptism record, Kościół pw. św. Jakuba, Bobrowo (Bobrau)

  • Franciszka (Francisca) was born 3 Apr 1875 in Zgnilloblott (Königsmoor/Zgniłobłoty) and baptized at Kościół pw. św. Jakuba (Saint James the Apostle) in Bobrau (Bobrowo). She died 30 Apr 1875, twenty seven days later.
1876 Jan Maciejewski birth marked

Johann Maciejewski birth/baptism record, Kościół pw. św. Jakuba, Bobrowo (Bobrau)

  • Jan (Johann) was born 16 Feb 1876 in Zgnilloblott (Königsmoor/Zgniłobłoty) and baptized at Kościół pw. św. Jakuba (Saint James the Apostle) in Bobrau (Bobrowo). He lived only two years, and died 7 Feb 1878.
1878 Marian Maciejewski birth marked

Marian Maciejewski birth/baptism record, Kościół pw. św. Jakuba, Bobrowo (Bobrau)

  • Marian was born in Zgnilloblott (Königsmoor/Zgniłobłoty) and baptized 18 Aug 1878 at Kościół pw. św. Jakuba (Saint James the Apostle) in Bobrau (Bobrowo).
1880 Julian Maciejewski birth

Julian Maciejewski birth/baptism record, Kościół pw. św. Jakuba, Bobrowo (Bobrau)

  • Julian was born 14 Dec 1880 in Zgnilloblott (Königsmoor/Zgniłobłoty) and baptized 26 Dec 1880 at Kościół pw. św. Jakuba (Saint James the Apostle) in Bobrau (Bobrowo). In his baptism record the baby is listed as Julian and and his civil birth record lists him as Thomas. His grandfather was named Tomasz Maciejewski.
1880 Thomas Maciejewski 69_1246_0_2_1_1019

Thomas Maciejewski civil birth record, Torun Archives

Of the six babies born, only three boys were alive in Zgniłobłoty in early 1882: Franciszek was nine, Marian was three, and Tomasz Julian was one year old.

1882 Maciejewski deaths marked

Death Records, Kościół Św Jakuba Apostoła, Bobrau, Strasburg, West Prussia

The May of 1882 was very hard for Jan and Weronika, as they lost all three of their children.

1882 Maciejewski deaths

Maciejewski Children Death Records, Kościół Św Jakuba, Bobrowo, (Bobrau)

Franz died May 16th, Thomas Julian on May 19th, and Marian on May 29th of 1882. Since the same cause was listed for all three deaths, I thought it must have been an infection. I asked several people for help deciphering it, and a researcher online identified “Bräune.” In English, it was known as quinsy, a peritonsillar abscess, a known complication of tonsillitis.

1882 cause of death

1882 Cause of Death for Maciejewski Children

I did not see it, but she referred me to  the German Glossary of Causes of Death and other Archaic Medical Terms, from Rudy’s List of Archaic Medical Terms at http://antiquusmorbus.com.

braune

Bräune Example

It listed an example from a church record from Mecklenburg, Germany, and I could see the similarity.

The children’s  deaths were recorded with the German authorities, and were listed in the Torin Archives.

Still Jan and Weronika persevered. She became pregnant again, and nine months later, in February of 1883, they had my grandfather Antoni. Later that same year they immigrated to America, where they added five more children to their family, who all grew to adulthood.

1900 Veronica Maciejewski census

1900 Census, Veronica Maciejewski, Buffalo, New York

Although in the 1900 census, Weronika reported that she had given birth to fourteen children, I was only able to find records for twelve. So, at a minimum, Weronika had a baby approximately every 2.2 years–from her first, Władysław, in 1870, to her last, Ludwik, in 1894.

Maciejewski children

Here is a summary of the known Maciejewski children.Jan Weronika kids[1]  Kościół Świętego Andrzeja Apostoła  (St. Andrew the Apostle) in Groß Brudzaw (Brudzawy), although dating from the 14th century, was identified as a branch of Groß Kruschin.

Sources

Władysław birth, LDS Family History Library, “Nieżywiȩć (Brodnica),” database, Kościół rzymsko-katolicki. Parafja, Family Search (familysearch.com: accessed June 2018), Ladislaus Maciejewski; citing Germany, Preußen, Westpreußen, Niezywienc – Church records. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSZR-ZKWQ?i=295&cat=237019

Władysław death, LDS Family History Library, “Nieżywiȩć (Brodnica),” database, Kościół rzymsko-katolicki. Parafja, Family Search (familysearch.com: accessed June 2018), Ladislaus Maciejewski; citing Germany, Preußen, Westpreußen, Niezywienc – Church records. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSV7-YSFW-N?i=180&cat=237019

Franciszek birth, LDS Family History Library, “Kruszyny (Brodnica),” database, Kościół rzymsko-katolicki. Parafja, Family Search (familysearch.com: accessed June 2018), Franz Maciejewski; citing Germany, Preußen, Westpreußen, Groß Kruschin (Kr. Strasburg) – Church records. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSZ5-K9M6-2?i=164&cat=15201

Franciszka birth, LDS Family History Library, “Bobrowo (Brodnica),” database, Kościół rzymsko-katolicki. Parafja, Family Search (familysearch.com: accessed February 2018), Franciszka Maciejewski; citing Germany, Preußen, Westpreußen, Bobrau – Church records. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSZ5-5N9F?i=261&cat=217507

Franciszka death, LDS Family History Library, “Bobrowo (Brodnica),” database, Kościół rzymsko-katolicki. Parafja, Family Search (familysearch.com: accessed February 2018), Franciszka Maciejewski; citing Germany, Preußen, Westpreußen, Bobrau – Church records. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSZ5-BCM2?i=136&cat=217507

Johann birth, LDS Family History Library, “Bobrowo (Brodnica),” database, Kościół rzymsko-katolicki. Parafja, Family Search (familysearch.com: accessed February 2018), Johann Maciejewski; citing Germany, Preußen, Westpreußen, Bobrau – Church records.
https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSZ5-5N9H?i=269&cat=217507

Johann death, LDS Family History Library, “Bobrowo (Brodnica),” database, Kościół rzymsko-katolicki. Parafja, Family Search (familysearch.com: accessed February 2018), Johann Maciejewski; citing Germany, Preußen, Westpreußen, Bobrau – Church records.
https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSZ5-5N9H?i=269&cat=217507

“Archiwum Państwowe w Toruniu,” database, Genealogia w Archiwach (www.genealogiawarchiwach.pl: accessed January 2018), Johann Maciejewski; citing Urząd Stanu Cywilnego.

Marian birth, LDS Family History Library, “Bobrowo (Brodnica),” database, Kościół rzymsko-katolicki. Parafja, Family Search (familysearch.com: accessed February 2018), Marian Maciejewski; citing Germany, Preußen, Westpreußen, Bobrau – Church records.
https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSXN-P9V3-5?i=335&cat=217507

“Archiwum Państwowe w Toruniu,” database, Genealogia w Archiwach (www.genealogiawarchiwach.pl: accessed January 2018), Thomas Maciejewski; citing Urząd Stanu Cywilnego.

Julian birth, LDS Family History Library, “Bobrowo (Brodnica),” database, Kościół rzymsko-katolicki. Parafja, Family Search (familysearch.com: accessed February 2018), Julian Maciejewski; citing Germany, Preußen, Westpreußen, Bobrau – Church records.
https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSXN-P9V3-5?i=335&cat=217507

“Archiwum Państwowe w Toruniu,” database, Genealogia w Archiwach (www.genealogiawarchiwach.pl: accessed January 2018), Franz, Julius, and Marian Maciejewski deaths; citing Urząd Stanu Cywilnego.

1900 Federal Census, United States, population schedule, Buffalo (city), New York, enumeration district (ED) 70, Veronica Maciejewski; digital images, HeritageQuest Online (heritagequestonline.com : accessed December 2014).

Looking For a Common Maciejewski Ancestor

In A Tale of Two Families, I wrote about some AncestryDNA matches and the records I found while trying to discover our common ancestor(s). Briefly,

  • A baby boy was born to a young woman in Buffalo, New York, in 1906. One hundred eleven years later his great-grandson tested with AncestryDNA and matched several Maciejewski family members. I was surprised to find the connection, and researched it.
  • The first section looks at Tadeusz/Theodore Jurek‘s grandparents and great-grandparents back in Prussia. We do not appear to have a genetic connection there, so our relatively close DNA connection appears to be with Tadeusz‘ parents. Who were they?
  • The second section shows the Maciejewski and Jurek fathers died in 1890 and 1896.
  • In 1900 and 1905, the widows raised their kids, who were about the same ages, and the families moved to the same street. They knew one another. Proximity was important for baby-making.
  • In the 1910 census, Tadeusz Jurek appeared. Who was his mother? Not Władysława (Lottie), for sure. She had had four kids in seven years. Was it Marianna or Stanisława?
  • Multiple events show Marianna Jurek was Tadeusz‘ mother.
  • Interrelationships show that this Tadeusz/Theodore Jurek is the same person seen in Buffalo and Rochester, and links to the family in Long Island.
  • In early 2018, Tadeusz/Theodore Jurek‘s grandson also did a DNA test. AncestryDNA estimates that he is my second cousin.

Since we know I am not closely related to Marianna Jurek, F. would only be a half cousin, on Tadeusz‘ father’s side. Given our genetic connection, the two mostly likely candidates for the father of Marianna‘s son are Antoni Maciejewski or his brother Konstanty/Gust, since Ludwik was only eleven in 1905.

Maciejewski Jurek

Maciejewski and Jurek children in Buffalo, New York

  • If Antoni were the father, then
    • Tadeusz/Theodore and my father would be half-brothers,
    • F.‘s mother and I would be half first cousins, and
    • F. would be my half first-cousin one generation removed (half 1C1R).
  • If Konstanty/Gust were the father, then
    • Tadeusz/Theodore and my father would be half first cousins,
    • F.‘s mother and I would be half second cousins, and
    • F. would be my half second cousin one generation removed (half 2C1R).

AncestryDNA says that F. and I share “208 centimorgans across 8 DNA segments” and estimates we are second cousins. Statistically,

  • second cousins share about 233 centimorgans (range 46-515)
  • half 1C1R share about 226 centimorgans (range 57-530)
  • half 2C1R share about 73 centimorgans (range 0-341)

From analysis so far, it appears more likely that Antoni Maciejewski was Tadeusz/Theodore Jurek‘s father, but it could also have been his brother Konstanty/Gust.

Sources

https://myfamilyhistoryresearch.wordpress.com/2018/05/25/a-tale-of-two-families/

Bettinger, Blaine, Shared cM Project, International Society of Genetic Genealogy, https://isogg.org/wiki/File:Shared_cM_version_3.jpg, accessed 3 Jun 2018

 

A Tale of Two Families

Some of the more popular reasons people test DNA are to learn more about their heritage and perhaps, find some new relatives. After my own DNA test in late 2015, I was able to connect with the previously unknown daughter of a second cousin, and confirmed dozens of other known relatives.

In the fall of 2017, a new match appeared on AncestryDNA, estimated to be my fourth cousin, with 75 centimorgans shared across 3 DNA segments. We had multiple shared matches–3 great-grandchildren, 3 great-great-grandchildren, and 1 great-great-great-granddaughter of Jan and Veronica Lewandowska Maciejewski–so we obviously have Maciejewski and/or Lewandowski ancestors in common. I wanted to learn more about our connection.

His family was from Long Island, New York. From the family tree he posted online, I could see that his mother’s family was not Polish. His father’s ancestors were Polish, so that was our likely connection. The census records for his father’s father’s parents consistently said they had come from Russian-Poland. The Maciejewski family had come from West Prussia, so that was not a link to our shared heritage. I started looking for information about his father’s mother’s family.

I found a link to his grandparents’ 1950 wedding announcement in a Long Island paper. The article titled “Nassau Summer Brides” identified the bride’s parents as Mr. and Mrs. Theodore Jurek. When I searched for Theodore Jurek in census records, I was surprised to learn that in his early years, he had lived on the same street in Buffalo, New York, as my great-grandmother Veronica Maciejewska and her family!

So here is the tale of two families…

In December 1883, Jan and Weronika Lewandowska Maciejewski immigrated to Buffalo, New York, with their infant Antoni. The family grew with the arrival of Konstanty (August), Wiktorya (Dorota), Marya, Anna, and Ludwik. Jan and Weronika had been married in 1869 in Kościół św. Jana Chrzciciela, Nieżywięć, West Prussia.

In 1888, Jan and Teofila Rossa Jurek also immigrated to Buffalo, New York, with their daughters Władysława and Marianna. In Buffalo, they had Franciszek and Stanisława. I was able to find a baptism entry for Stanisława at St. Adalbert’s Roman Catholic Church in Buffalo in 1890, which showed that her parents had been born in Posen (Poznań in Polish).

1890 Stanislawa Jurek birth cropped

1890 Baptism Record, St. Adalbert’s RC Church, Buffalo, New York

The Poznan Project has indexed the marriages from the parishes of this region, and a search for Jan Jurek and Teofila found their marriage in Kościół pw. św. Wita (St. Vitus), the Catholic parish in Słupy, entry 8 / 1884:

  • Joannes Jurek (24 years old)
    father: Joseph Jurek , mother: Marianna Świtalska
  • Theophila Rossa (26 years old)
    father: Jacobus Rossa , mother: Anna Domagała

Słupy, Schubin, Posen, was approximately 66 miles from Nieżywięć, West Prussia. Both locations are currently in Kujawsko-Pomorskie, Poland.

Death of the Fathers

Sadly, the fathers of both these families met with untimely ends. Jan Jurek died in 1890. An article on the front page of the March 6, 1890 Buffalo Evening News has the entry “Killed by the Cars” saying that “Jan Jurek, a Polish laborer, tried to board a passing Central engine at the William street crossing at 7:30 this morning. He slipped and was killed. Coroner Tucker.”

1890 Jan Jurek death

1890 Buffalo Evening News

Jan Maciejewski died 30 Apr 1896, of endocarditis, and was buried at St. Stanislaus Cemetery, in Cheektowaga, New York.

1896 Jan Maciejewski Death Certificate

1896 Death Certificate, Buffalo, New York

Widows and Their Families

In the 1900 federal census, both women were listed as widows. Veronica Maciejewski was living at 242 Detroit Street, with her children Anthony (17), Constanty (15), Victoria (12), Mary (11), Ann (8), and Louis (5).

1900 Veronica Maciejewski census

1900 Maciejewski Census, Buffalo, New York

In 1900, Teofila Jurek was at 169 Rother Avenue with Wladislawa (14), Mary (13), Frank (11), Stanislawa (9), and Teofila’s mother, Anna Rosa (78).

1900-jurek-census-e1523386901598.jpg

1900 Jurek census, Buffalo, New York

Further research in church and civil records in Bobrowo and Słupy, Prussia, as well as Buffalo, New York, showed the birth dates for the children of these families.

Maciejewski Jurek

Children of Maciejewski and Jurek Families in Buffalo, New York

In 1905, the Jurek family lived at 160 Stanislaus Street: Teofila (41), Mary (18), Frank (16), Stella (14), and Anna (84).

1905 Jurek Rosa NYS census cropped

1905 New York State Census, Jurek Family, Buffalo, New York

The Maciejewski family lived at 303 Detroit Street in 1905: Veronica (55), Anthony (22), Konstanty (20), Victoria (18), Mary (16), Anna (13), and Louis (10).

1905 Veronica Maciejewski census

1905 New York State Census, Maciejewski Family, Buffalo, New York

Both women purchased homes on Goodyear Avenue. In the Buffalo Courier on August 21, 1905, under DEEDS—CITY was “Martin Hauck to Veronica Maciejewska, Goodyear Avenue, west side, 520 feet north Empire Street, 30 feet front, $1.”  On June 15, 1907, under MORTGAGES—CITY was the entryTeofila Jurek to Grace H. Selkirk, Goodyear Avenue. 385.69 feet south Sycamore Street. $2,000.”

1910 Census Records

There were more changes to the families. In the 1910 census, Thaddeus Jurek (2) had joined the Telofila Jurek family at 212 Goodyear Avenue, along with Frank (21), Maryanna (22), and Stella (19).

1910-jurek-census.jpg

1910 Jurek Census, Buffalo, New York

Władysława Jurek had married Szczepan Kubiak about 1903 and the couple were living with their four children Edward, Mary, Louisa, and Irene at 97 Koons Avenue for the 1910 census.

1910-kubiak-census-cropped-e1525812086918.jpg

1910 Kubiak Census, Buffalo, New York

On 5 Aug 1907, Antoni Maciejewski had married Marya Szczepańska in Bennington, New York. In the 1910 census, they and their daughters Sophia and Celia were living with his mother and his siblings Victoria (28), Mary (21), Anna (18), and Ludwik (15) at 127 Goodyear Avenue.

1910 Maciejewski census 4450075_00386

1910 Maciejewski Census, Buffalo, New York

On 5 Apr 1910, Konstanty Maciejewski had married Marya Kajdasz in Buffalo, New York, and the couple was living at 301 Mills Street. Konstanty was called Gust, and used the name August Warner in later years, as documented in How Did Maciejewski Become Warner?

1910 GustavMary Maciejewski census cropped

1910 Maciejewski Census, Buffalo, New York

Marianna Jurek Married Szczepan Kozłowski

In America, Telofila was called Tillie Jurek. She and her cat were featured in a story in the Buffalo Courier on 27 February 1915, “Destroys Two of Cat’s Lives and Draws Fine of $10 in City Court.”

1915 Tilli Jurek cat

1915 Buffalo Courier, Buffalo, New York

Tillie Rosa was listed as the bride’s mother when Mary Anna Jurek married Szczepan Kozłowski in the Polish National Catholic Church in Rochester, New York, on 18 Oct 1919.

1919 Kozlowski Jurek marriage

1919 Kozlowski-Jurek Marriage Record, Rochester, New York

In the 1920 census, Tadeusz Jurek, 12 years old, is listed as the nephew of Frank (31), living with his grandmother, Teofila (60), and Stanisława (28), at 212 Goodyear Avenue in Buffalo.

1920 Jurek census

1920 Jurek Census, Buffalo, New York

In the 1925 New York census, the Stephen and Mary Kozłowski family at 19 Pulaski Street in Rochester includes Theodore Jurek, age 18 and Frank Kozłowski, age 3.

1925 Kozlowski Jurek census

1925 Kozlowski-Jurek Census, Rochester, New York

Still at 19 Pulaski Street in Rochester in 1940, Stephen and Mary Kozłowski’s family included Frank (18), Richard (13), and Norma (10).

1940 Kozlowski census m-t0627-02848-00417

1940 Kozlowski Census, Rochester, New York

Mary (Jurek) Kozłowski died 1 Mar 1947 at her home, 19 Pulaski St. The account in the Rochester NY Democrat Chronicle of 4 March 1947 said she was survived by her husband, “one daughter Norma Kozlowski; three sons, Theodore of Hicksvllle, N. Y., Frank, and Cpl. Richard Kozlowski, U. S. Marine Corp.; one sister, Mrs. Lottie Kubiak; one brother, Frank Jurek, two granddaughters and one grandson; several nieces and nephews.”

When Frank Kozłowski died in 1961, his obituary in the Rochester NY Democrat Chronicle on 26 July 1961 stated “Survivors include his wife, two brothers, Theodore Jurek of Bethpage, L.I., and Deputy Sheriff Richard Kozlowski of Churchville; a sister, Norma Kozlowski of Brockport, and several nieces and nephews.”

Tadeusz/Theodore Jurek

Theodore Jurek joined the United States Army 29 Sep 1927. He married Helen Skszyba, daughter of Stanisław Skszyba and Marya Pliszka, who was born 23 Jan 1910 in Duryea, Luzerne, Pennsylvania, United States. The couple lived with their three children on Nassau Road in Hempstead, Nassau, New York in the 1940 federal census.

1940-theodore-jurek-census-m-t0627-02688-00584-e1527219384253.jpg

1940 Jurek Census, Hempstead, New York

Theodore Jurek’s military and Social Security records said he was born 21 Mar 1906 and died 2 Oct 1977. His last residence was listed as Bethpage, New York. He and his wife Helen were buried at Long Island National Cemetery.

Because in former generations, physical proximity was needed to create a baby, I have looked for common places where our known ancestors lived. Based on my “extremely high” AncestryDNA connections with his great-grandson and another Jurek descendant (208 centimorgans shared across 8 DNA segments, an estimated second cousin), and even more Maciejewski family descendants in common, we know the families are related. Perhaps additional research in Buffalo records and further analysis of DNA relationships will give more information about the identity of Tadeusz‘ father, but meanwhile, we remain DNA cousins.

Notes About Names

Polish names - Jurek

Because Polish people would speak the Polish language and give their children Polish names, they are the first names I have listed here. Other names listed in church and official records from Prussia may be in Latin or German, and names in American records may be either an English version of the same name (Ludwik/Louis), or an Americanized nickname (Władysława/Lottie).

 

 

 

Sources

https://myfamilyhistoryresearch.wordpress.com/2018/03/18/finding-new-cousins-with-dna-evidence/

“Nassau Summer Brides,” Nassau Review-Star, Freeport, New York, 3 July 1950, Page 5, col 1.

https://myfamilyhistoryresearch.wordpress.com/2018/02/20/maciejewski-family-arrived-in-new-york-21-december-1883/

https://myfamilyhistoryresearch.wordpress.com/2018/02/13/1883-birth-of-antoni-maciejewski-in-zgnilobloty-west-prussia/

https://myfamilyhistoryresearch.wordpress.com/2015/03/04/constantine-maciejewski-aka-august-warner-and-his-son-daniel-warner/

https://myfamilyhistoryresearch.wordpress.com/2015/04/21/marriage-of-johann-maciejewski-and-veronica-lewandowska-in-niezywiec-prussia/

St. Adalbert RC Church, Buffalo, New York, Church records, FHL microfilm, Family History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah, Stanisława Jurek.

Łukasz Bielecki, “Poznan Project,” database, Poznan Project (http://poznan-project.psnc.pl: accessed March 2018), Jurek – Rossa; citing church records or Urząd Stanu Cywilnego (Civil Registry Office).

“Killed by the Cars”, Buffalo Evening News, Buffalo, New York, 6 March 1890, page 1.

Buffalo, New York, death certificate no. 231 (1 May 1896), Jan Madjewski; City Clerk’s Office, City Hall, Buffalo, New York.

St. Stanislaus Bishop & Martyr RC Church (Buffalo, New York), , Death Register, 1896, Jan Maciejewski; FHL microfilm .

1900 Federal Census, United States, population schedule, Buffalo (city), New York, enumeration district (ED) 70, Veronica Maciejewski

1900 Federal Census, New York, population schedule, Buffalo Ward 14, Erie, New York, Anna Rosa

LDS Family History Library, “Bobrowo (Brodnica),” database, Kościół rzymsko-katolicki. Parafja, Family Search (familysearch.com: accessed February 2018), Anton Maciejewski; citing Germany, Preußen, Westpreußen, Bobrau – Church records.

LDS Family History Library, “Słupy (Szubin),” database, Kościół rzymsko-katolicki. Parafja, Family Search (familysearch.com: accessed 11 May 2018), Władysława and Marianna Jurek; citing Germany, Preußen, Posen, Slupy – Church records.

1905 New York State Census, New York, population schedule, Buffalo Ward 14, Erie, New York, USA, Anna Rosa

1905 New York State Census, New York, population schedule, Buffalo, New York, , Veronica Maciejewski

DEEDS Veronica Maciejewska, Buffalo Courier, Buffalo, New York, 21 August 1905, Page 8, column 4.

MORTGAGES Teofila Jurek, Buffalo Courier, Buffalo, New York, 15 June 1907.

1910 Federal Census, New York State, population schedule, Buffalo Ward 12, Erie, New York, Stephen Kubiak

1910 Federal Census, New York State, population schedule, Buffalo, New York, Veronica Maciejewski

Konstantyn Maciejewski and Mary Kajdasz, (5 April 1910), Marriage Record; Erie County Courthouse, Buffalo, New York.

1910 Federal Census, New York State, population schedule, Buffalo, New York, enumeration district (ED) 104, sheet 18, Gustav Maciejewski

https://myfamilyhistoryresearch.wordpress.com/2017/06/04/how-did-maciejewski-become-warner/

1910 Federal Census, New York State, population schedule, Buffalo Ward 12, Erie, New York, Teofila Jurek

“Destroys Two of Cat’s Lives and Draws Fine of $10 in City Court” Buffalo Courier, Buffalo, New York, 27 February 1915, page 6, column 2-3

New York, County Marriage Records, 1847-1849, 1907-1936 [database on-line]. Lehi, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2016.

1920 Federal Census, New York, population schedule, Buffalo Ward 16, Erie, New York, Teofila Jurek

1925 New York State Census, New York, population schedule, Rochester Ward 17, Monroe, Stephen Kozlowski

1940 Federal Census, New York, population schedule, Rochester, Monroe, New York, 19 Pulaski Street, Stephen Kozlowski

1940 Federal Census, New York, population schedule, Hempstead, Nassau, New York, Theodore Jurek

Mary Kozlowski, Democrat Chronicle, Rochester, New York, 4 March 1947, page 6.

Frank Kozlowski, Democrat Chronicle, Rochester, New York, 26 July 1961.

Social Security Administration, “U.S. Social Security Death Index,” database, Social Security Applications and Claims (: accessed December 2017), Helen Jurek, 053546980.

Social Security Administration, “U.S. Social Security Death Index,” database, Death Master File (: accessed February 2018), Theodore Jurek, 111-01-8499, before 1951.

US VA, National Cemetery Administration, “Nationwide Gravesite Locator,” database, US Department of Veteran Affairs (http://gravelocator.cem.va.gov/ : accessed January 2018), Theodore S Sr Jurek.

Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 11 May 2018), memorial page for Theodore S Jurek, Sr (21 Mar 1906–2 Oct 1977), Find A Grave Memorial no. 2718164, citing Long Island National Cemetery, East Farmingdale, Suffolk County, New York, USA ; Maintained by US Veterans Affairs Office (contributor 5) .

 

How Did Maciejewski Become Warner?

Polish names are sometimes a mouthful, difficult to pronounce and confusing for English speakers. An ethnic name would mark a person as different. As immigrants and their children tried to assimilate into American culture, many original ethnic names were modified or altered.

Name changes became a challenge in researching my own family history, when I learned that both of my grandfather’s brothers and their offspring used the family name Warner instead of their birth name of Maciejewski. I recently asked several Warner descendants how their family name changed from Maciejewski to Warner, and they did not know. In the twenty-first century, some were not even aware that the ancestral family name had been Maciejewski!

My grandfather, Antoni Maciejewski, was just a baby in 1884 when he came to America with his parents, Jan and Weronika Lewandowski Maciejewski. The family lived on Townsend Street in Buffalo, and the births of Konstanty, Wicktoria, Marya, Anna, and Ludwik followed. I found the children’s baptismal records in the registers of St. Stanislaus RC Church in Buffalo, New York. However, I did not find their births recorded in civil records for the state of New York or the city of Buffalo.

Ludwik Maciejewski used the name Louis Warner in the 1930s.  While his legal name was still Louis Maciejewski on his death certificate and records when he died in 1938, his widow and sons used the name Warner on official documents.

My father had told me that his uncle had used the name Gust Warner, so I was surprised to learn that his baptismal name had been Konstanty, but I think I have worked it out.

In Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy (1878), one of the main characters is Konstantin “Kostya” Levin. I began looking at nicknames for the name Konstanty. Noted Polish researcher William “Fred” Hoffman identifies Kostka as “a name meaning ‘little bone,’ which can mean ‘dice’ or ‘ankle’ or any small bone, or –probably more often — from a diminutive of the name Konstanty, ‘Constantine.’” In the book First Names of the Polish Commonwealth: Origins and Meanings, by William F. Hoffman and George W. Helon (Polish Genealogical Society of America, 1998), other diminutives for Konstanty are Kost, Kostek, and Kostuś.

One can imagine Konstanty being called “Kostka” or “Kostek” or a variation as a child. If the k sound is voiced (the vocal cords vibrate), it would sound something like “Gustka” or “Gustek.” When he became older, he likely preferred it shortened to “Gust.” When he identified himself as Gust, people assumed it meant Gustav, as in the 1910 census, or August, as in other documents. There is more about the relationships between the names Constantine and Gus, and Gus and the Polish name August, in Mike Campbell’s “Behind the Name” database at http://www.behindthename.com/name/constantine, http://www.behindthename.com/name/gus-2, http://www.behindthename.com/name/gus-1, http://www.behindthename.com/name/august.

1913 Daniel K. Maciejewski birth

1913 Daniel Maciejewski Birth Record, Buffalo, New York

1913 Daniel K Maciejewski baby picture - Courier 9-28-1913

1913 Buffalo Courier

In 1913, when Konstanty and Mary‘s  son Daniel Maciejewski was born, he was given the middle initial K. presumably after his father’s first name. Daniel was a pretty baby. His picture was featured in the Buffalo Courier for the week ending September 28, 1913.

1915 Kostanty Maria Daniel Alojzy Maciejewski

1915 NYS census, Buffalo, New York

In the 1915 New York State census, Konstanty and Maria lived at 301 Mills Street with their sons Daniel and Alojzy. Unfortunately, Alojzy Maciejewski died in 1917, and was not included with the family in the 1920 census.

1920 August Maciejewski census

1920 census, Buffalo, New York

The family moved to 116 Ivy Street between 1920 and 1925, and Konstanty and Mary Maciejewski are listed at that address for the 1925, 1930, and 1940 censuses.

1930 Constanty Mary Maciejewski census cropped

1930 census, Buffalo, New York

1940 Constantine and Mary Maciejewski census

1940 census, Buffalo, New York

While government documents recorded the family name as Maciejewski until 1940, Aug Warner is identified at 116 Ivy Street in the Buffalo city directories as early as 1926.

1926 Warner Aug Buffalo city directory

1926 City Directory, Buffalo, New York

Aug C (Mary) Warner is the entry in 1931 at the same address.

1931 Warner AugCMary and LouisMartha city directory (2)

1931 City Directory, Buffalo, New York

In 1940, August Warner made his name official, with a birth certificate signed by his mother Veronica. She was in her nineties, and lived on Briscoe with her daughter. While usually a midwife or physician signed birth certificates, no one could deny that his mother was present at her son’s birth!

1940 August Warner 1885 birth

August Warner birth certificate, signed 17 July 1940

Interestingly, as his father began to use the first name August instead of Konstanty, Daniel used the middle initial A. (for August) instead of K. (for Konstanty). Daniel’s son is also Daniel A. Warner, as is his son, with three generations named Daniel August Warner!

Martha Jankowski Maciejewski Warner Malyszka

After Louis Warner (born Ludwik Maciejewski) died in February, 1938, his widow Martha applied for Social Security in December 1938. She used the name Martha Janke Warner.

[Martha Janke Janke] 
 Gender: Female
 Race: White
 Birth Date: 18 Jul 1896
 Birth Place: Buffalo New, New York
 Father Name: Louis Janke
 Mother Name: Annastasia J
 Type of Claim: Original SSN.
 Notes: Dec 1938: Name listed as MARTHA JANKE WARNER
 Source Information
 Ancestry.com. U.S., Social Security Applications and Claims Index, 
 1936-2007 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: 
 Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2015.
 Original data: Social Security Applications and Claims, 1936-2007.

 

In her son Henry’s marriage record in Indiana in 1939, 1939 henry warner zora shaponich marriage pageMartha’s residence was listed as Detroit, but she later moved back to Buffalo. Her grandchildren visited her there. Back home, she may have returned to using the name Martha Maciejewski.

On Friday, Feb. 22. 1957, the Buffalo Courier-Express Record of Buffalo indicated a marriage license had been issued to “John Malyszka, 1814 Genesee—Martha Maciejewski, 1814 Genesee.”

1957 Malyszka-Maciejewski marriage Buffalo NY Courier Express 2-22-1957

The New York State Marriage Index showed Certificate Number 9148 for their marriage in Buffalo, New York, on 2 Mar 1957.

Her granddaughter, a nurse, reported Martha had diabetes, and New York records showed that she died in July 1959 at age 62 years. The New York State Health Department Genealogical Research Death Index beginning 1957 showed

Year of Death 1959
State File Number 48105
Decedent First Name MARTHA
Decedent Middle Name
Decedent Last Name MALYSZKA
Decedent Age 62
Decedent Age Unit Yrs
Decedent Gender F
Date of Death 07/12/1959
Residence Code 1401

 

Social Security had a Life Claim for Martha Malyska Maciejewska, with the same birth date as Martha Janke Warner.

Name: Martha Malyska MacIejewska
Birth Date: 18 Jul 1896
Claim Date: 6 May 1959
Type of Claim: Life Claim
Notes: 03 Sep 1976: Name listed as MARTHA MALYSKA MACIEJEWSKA
Source Information
Ancestry.com. U.S., Social Security Applications and Claims Index, 
1936-2007 [database on-line].Provo, UT, USA: 
Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2015.
Original data: Social Security Applications and Claims, 1936-2007.

 

Find A Grave identified the final resting place of  Martha Jankowski Malyszka (1896-1959) and John Malyszka (1887-1963) at Holy Mother of the Rosary Parish Cemetery in Cheektowaga, New York.

Malyszka cemetery

Updated Jun 2018 with marriage date.

Ludwik Maciejewski, AKA Louis Warner

Ludwik Jan Maciejewski was born to Jan and Weronika Lewandowska Maciejewski in Buffalo, Erie, New York, 26 August 1894, and was baptized at St. Stanislaus Church. The youngest child, he was only a year old when his father died on 30 April 1896.

1910 Maciejewski Jankowski census

In 1910, Veronica Maciejewski and her children lived at 127 Goodyear Avenue in Buffalo. In the 1910 census, their neighbors were Lucasz and Anastazya Jankowski and family.

Louis was especially close to two of the Jankowski children.

 

1911 Louis Maciejewski 9-23 Courier1911 Louis Maciejewski 10-21 Courier

In 1911, Louis Maciejewski and Bronisław (Bruno) Jankowski got into some trouble for fighting and were sent to the reformatory in Elmira, New York, according to accounts in the Buffalo Courier newspapers on October 21 and 23.

 

Louis Maciejewski and Martha Jankowska 1916 Maciejewski Jankowski marriage licensewere married on February 14, 1916.

1918 Louis Jan Maciejewski WWI draft registration

 

In 1918, Louis registered for the WWI draft as L. Jan Maciejewski, signing his name Louis J. Maciejewski. He lived at 127 Goodyear with his wife and child.

 

1930 Louis Maciejewski censusLouis and Martha had three children: Henry, Genevieve, and Louis Maciejewski. In 1930, the family lived at 144 Brinkman Street in Buffalo. Louis was identified as a toolmaker.

Like his older brother Gust, Louis and his family used the name Warner. The Buffalo Courier Express on November 10, 1936, had a feature about “Attractive Autumn Brides”: “Mrs. William E. Pfister, Jr., was, before her marriage to Mr. Pfister, Miss Genevieve Warner, daughter of Mr. & Mrs. Louis Warner of Detroit, Mich.”

1936 Genevieve Warner Pfister 11-10 Courier Express

Louis died 2 February 1938 at the age of 43. On February 7, 1938, the Buffalo Courier Express ran a short obituary for “MACIEJEWSKI—Louis J., husband of Martha. Interment, February 5th, in H1938 Louis Maciejewski 2-7 Courier Express obitoly Sepulchre Cemetery.” The brevity of the notice and that it was published after any wake or funeral services tend to indicate a death under unusual circumstances.